Tag Archives: NCSU

A forest’s future

A forest’s future,  N&O

Nice editorial and sentiments from the N&O as usual. It is good to see that the university has agreed to keep the Forest, but they still need to fulfill and enhance the vision of “..using the forest as an academic research center.”

The Hofmann should be used for research, for students, and for education (its original and enduring intent), and for benefits to local citizens–who forego property tax revenues for the “nonprofit educational forest”–yet pay for all the roads that the loggers and truckers use for free to access the forest, as well as forego local school, fire, and police revenues.

Despite the NCSU rhetoric and PR, Faculty and students and locals are still being denied access to use the Hofmann Forest, which in no way fulfills its mission or its treatment as a charitable, scientific, and educational tax-free organization. So, the Hofmann should renew its NCSU and local education and conservation missions, so everybody can benefit from its protection and management, not just private fund raising administrators in Raleigh.

Fred Cubbage

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Conflicting Goals and Priorities – Questions for the NC Supreme Court on the Sale of Hofmann Forest

In the NWQEP NOTES, The NCSU Water Quality Group Newsletter, Number 138 August 2013 ISSN 1062-9149, one recommendation is outstanding:

…The State water quality agency should consider
encouraging the state, local agencies, or land trusts to
purchase riparian properties in cases where watershed
cleanup efforts have failed to be achieved or failed to be
lasting. Environmental agencies should review their
programs for conflicting mandates and implementations.
Specific roles, reporting requirements, and priorities should
be consistent.

We couldn’t agree more!  Granted, the above recommendation has a much narrower contextual focus than presented by the prospective sale of Hofmann Forest, but  it is alarmingly apropos to the apparent divergent goals and implementations highlighted by this sale of public land by NCSU and concurrent efforts within NCSU and other state agencies.

Will the NC supreme Court find that North Carolina’s various agencies and programs have conflicting goals (broader than mandates) and implementations with regard to the sale of Hofmann Forest?  Will they find the sale of Hofmann Forest consistent with the intent of the NC Constitution, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and UNC System Policy?

Does the apparent internal inconsistency of NCSU rushing to the sale, while simultaneously promoting  vastly disparate public policy, reflect a lack of cogent leadership within the University?  Is the sale of Hofmann Forest representative of a broader inconsistency within state government that only action by the NC Supreme Court or legislation could remedy?

NWQEP NOTES, The NCSU Water Quality Group Newsletter, Number 138, August 2013 ISSN 1062-9149

NCSU Water Quality Group

The North Carolina State University (NCSU) Water Quality Group is a multidisciplinary team that analyzes and evaluates nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control technologies and water quality programs in North Carolina and nationwide. We are a component of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service (NC CES), Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department (Bio&Ag) at North Carolina State University and the N.C. State University’s Soil and Water Environmental Technology Center (SWETC).

via NCSU Water Quality Group.

What is the biggest source of pollution in the ocean?

According to NOAA:

Eighty percent of pollution to the marine environment comes from the land. One of the biggest sources is called nonpoint source pollution, which occurs as a result of runoff. Nonpoint source pollution includes many small sources, like septic tanks, cars, trucks, and boats, plus larger sources, such as farms, ranches, and forest areas. Millions of motor vehicle engines drop small amounts of oil each day onto roads and parking lots. Much of this, too, makes its way to the sea.

Some water pollution actually starts as air pollution, which settles into waterways and oceans. Dirt can be a pollutant. Top soil or silt from fields or construction sites can run off into waterways, harming fish and wildlife habitats.

Nonpoint source pollution can make river and ocean water unsafe for humans and wildlife. In some areas, this pollution is so bad that it causes beaches to be closed after rainstorms.

More than one-third of the shellfish-growing waters of the United States are adversely affected by coastal pollution.

via What is the biggest source of pollution in the ocean?

So,  it makes sense for North Carolina to sell 79,000 acres of coastal forest land into private ownership with the only real restriction on land-use being the highest and best use real estate development doctrine?  What else is wrong with the sale of Hofmann Forest?

More Signs not a Good Sign

North Carolina spends lots of money on signs.  They are everywhere, along our roads, on river and stream banks, in coastal waters, and on beaches.  The signs may be informational, educational, or regulatory, but they are all there ostensibly for our benefit as citizens.  Signs for the benefit of citizens – good, right?  More, better?  Not so fast!  After the sale of Hofmann Forest, we’ll get a whole new crop of signs that will say one thing, but will be symbolic of something else entirely.

NCSU, a public University,  is selling Hofmann Forest, public land, to private entities, with no significant long-term restrictions against development.  On the other hand, we have the significant positive accomplishments of other North Carolina government entities working to protect and preserve sources for future drinking water supplies and to reduce the extent of  surface water quality impairment.

It is well known that development, including agriculture,  is the main source of water quality degradation and resulting impaired surface waters.  Research and conclusions on this subject, much conducted at NCSU,  are abundant and clear.  Across a wide spectrum of North Carolina government, this simple, but true, educational message is repeated again, and again.  You cannot escape North Carolina’s watershed-awareness and impact-of-development messages as you go about your life in this state.  You find them as you visit our state’s websites, schools, museums, aquariums, estuarium, parks, and even when you drive on our highways!  Ever see an “Entering Neuse Basin” sign?  Those signs, and the worthy efforts of which they are symbolic, are your tax dollars at work!

NCSU Officials, the NCSU Endowment Fund Board, and Attorney General Roy Copper, who are promoting and facilitating the sale of Hofmann Forest, must have missed all of the NCSU subject matter research and North Carolina’s extensive and well-intentioned watershed-awareness and impact-of-development messages.  How else could they be promoting and facilitating the sale of  Hofmann Forest,  with no significant long-term restrictions against development?  Hofmann Forest is a significant percentage of  the undeveloped land in three already impaired river basins of this state.

Maybe dysfunctional state government just likes signs.  By selling Hofmann Forest, North Carolina will almost certainly get more opportunities to put up closed shellfish waters and swimming advisory signs!  How do I know?  The state says so, again, and again, and again.  I didn’t even have to come up with that one myself!

By the way, those swimming advisory and closed shellfish waters signs, and the worthy efforts of which they are symbolic, are your tax dollars at work, too!

See, we really can pay for it both ways!  After the destruction of Hofmann Forest at the hands of the state, we’ll get a whole new crop of signs.  All these signs, especially the new ones,  will become symbolic of the North Carolina’s worthy efforts to protect us from the consequences of the North Carolina’s, not so worthy, sale of Hofmann Forest!  The signs will cease to have any real meaning related to their words.  Instead, they will just be symbolic of dysfunctional state government.

LETTER: Fracking is not worth the environmental risk | The Sanford Herald

The recent controversy over the quiet (until recently) proposed sale of NCSU Hofmann Research forest is a real eye-opener to the way government, power, and money put the interests and profits of a few individuals over the welfare of the majority. Visit savehofmannforest.org and pay attention to the comprehensive timeline of key events related to Hofmann Forest, and you’ll see the manipulative workings of power, politics, and money and the unethical application of nepotism and influence peddling. There is information there on how to funnel outrage to help stop this short-sighted action.

via LETTER: Fracking is not worth the environmental risk | The Sanford Herald.  Neither is the sale of Hofmann Forest!

Thank you Mitchell C. Reese, MD, and Jeannine D. Reese, Sanford, NC!

Remember the Berkeley protests of 1964 – Technician: Opinion

It’s possible on our campus to influence change and advocate for things we care about. College students have had an important voice in society in the past, but we shouldn’t relegate that power to history books. If students today can shelve their apathy and overcome fear of failure, they can make big changes in the world around them.

via Remember the Berkeley protests of 1964 – Technician: Opinion.

Let’s let the Opposition to the Sale of Hofmann Forest become another example of how students can make a difference!  It is not too late!

Meet the people who voted to sell Hofmann Forest!

Dear Friends of Hofmann Forest,

I am writing to invite you to a very special occasion! On Thursday, October 16, the NC State Natural Resources Foundation Board will be meeting at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Cary, NC, 10:00am. 201 Harrison Oaks Blvd, Cary, NC 27513 (just off I-40, behind Bass Pro Shops)

The Natural Resources Foundation, in case you don’t know, is the group whose vote in January, 2013 started the process of putting Hofmann Forest up for sale (even though they haven’t owned the forest since 1977). We would like it very much if a few of you could join us at the hotel that morning to express our feelings about the relative merits of their decision.

If you think you can make it, please RSVP to me with “NRF welcoming committee” in the subject line, and I’ll send you the details of what we have in mind. We should have plenty of Save Hofmann yard signs to give away at the event as well, so if you need a sign this is a good opportunity to pick one up.

One other thing – there are still a few million people in North Carolina (and beyond) who would be opposed to the Hofmann Forest sale, if only someone they knew took the time to explain what is going on and how they could get involved. Can you please take a moment to share the petition link below with your friends and family again, with a short message why you think protecting a 79,000-acre public forest is important in this day and age?
http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/save-hofmann-forest-from?source=c.fwd&r_by=10925835

If they need more info, you can refer them to our beautiful interactive map:
http://wn.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapTour/index.html?appid=80da886a8e7e4eb899a4d3e9c11c66bd

Thank you very much for sticking up for Hofmann Forest when no one else would. All of you deserve the very special new title: “Hofmann’s Heroes” – how does that sound?

Did I mention that the News and Observer reported that NCSU hopes to have the Hofmann deal closed on or before November 17? We don’t have very much time left to derail the sale…

For the forest,

Ron Sutherland, Ph.D.
NCSU Biology ’99
Conservation Scientist
Wildlands Network
ron@wildlandsnetwork.org

ps – great new Hofmann articles if you haven’t seen them:
http://www.northcarolinasportsman.com/details.php?id=4510
http://www.carolinacoastonline.com/tideland_news/news/article_b6e9cf92-496e-11e4-890e-6b6ddc639d4b.html

Hofmann Forest — Fortune or Infamy?

MEMORANDUM

Date: 17 September 2014 (Sent); Updated 28 September 2014

To: Sent to NCSU Leadership, Foundation, Boards, and Sustainability

From: Fred Cubbage, Professor, Coordinator, Natural Resources Program /FWC/
Joseph Roise, Professor, Director of Graduate Programs, FER /JR/

Subject: Hofmann Forest Sale Legacy

Hofmann Fortune or Infamy Updated V9

See also: Hofmann Forest Sale – Financial Boon or Regional Bust?