2010-01-27 Southwest Creek Camp Lejuene NC

2009-01-27 Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune NC

We launched our boat at Maple Landing. You turn east off of Route 17 atVerona to get there Turn left on the third dirt road and it will take you tothe ramp. You need a Base pass for your vehicle to do this.

This is the first batch of ALLIGATORWEED today. It was hung up behind a tree that had fallen into the river. We put our long handled clam rake into it and gently backed away with our 5 horse power motor. The entire massof tangled interwoven stems came out easily and we towed it out into the current. We hope it makes it all the way to salt water where it will be
killed. THIS WAS OPPOSOTE THE FIRST CONCRETE BARRIER.

We duplicated this same action on many more (but much fewer than usual)similar batches all the way up to the RR Bridge.

Picture missing.

This is Jim Niedermeyer’s boat tied up at the RR Bridge for our lunch. It is resting on crushed rock. ALLIGATORWEED grows on land here! It comes up through the crushed rock. It does not appear asquickly in the spring as that growing and floating in the water.

This needs to be sprayed this year early. It grew knee deep here and must be sprayed and killed to prevent it from contaminating the whole creek again.

Picture missing.

This picture is of the east channel at and above the RR bridge.
That lower left hand corner is the bridge railing. You can see last summer’s pictures here on our web site. The WEED was 50 to 60 feet of a solid mass two to three feet above water and 5 to 8 feet below water.

We Stewards of the White Oak River Basin with nature’s help have made this difference. We have cleaned it all out three times here at and under the bridge. We will do it again as soon as we get all ALLIGATORWEEd that remains upstream, at least as far as Rte 17, down to the bridge.

We do this exactly as described in the first picture above. The current of the river takes over and it carries it down to its death in salt water.

Picture missing.

This picture is taken of the west channel. Last summer this same area was almost solid ALLIGATORWEED. It was hung up on the old pilings which were cut off and left at water level. This happened on two different piling replacements. It was illegal both times. These pilings should be removed!

Picture missing.

This picture was taken from the bridge. The view is downstream. That log has branches under water. We released it and loads of alligatorweed. The current was very swift and brought it all down here and through the bridge!

Picture missing.

Here is another log that traps Alligatorweed, cans a bottles and every thing else that comes downriver. It should be removed.

Picture missing.

This was supposed to be a picture of that same log after we had removed the ALLIGATORWEED.

Picture missing.

The same log again that came down from upstream after we had released it.Here is a closeup of it. We will cleanup this mess next trip we hope and get all weed down to salt water.

Right now is an excellent time to do this. The high water makes for a strong fast current. The winter freezes have killed all above the surface.

Let’s join nature and get the job done this year. We can get rid of this foreign, horrible, invasive ALLIGATORWEED!

IT IS IN ITS WEAKEST AND MOST VULNERABLE STATE RIGHT NOW! THIS
SUMMER IT WILL DOUBLE IN VOLUME EVERY TWO TO THREE WEEKS.

AND WE HAVE HAVE EXCELLENT WATER FLOW NOW TO HELP US!

NOW IS THE TIME TO ACT.

WE NEED MORE VOLUNTEERS WITH CANOES, KAYAKS AND MOTORBOATS

PLEASE COME AND HELP US KILL THIS FOREIGN INVADER NOW. THANKS, ELMER

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2010-01-19. White Oak Riveer and Webb Creek Stella NC

2010-01-19 White Oak River and Webb Creek, Stella, NC
Here we are at Boondocks at Stella, NC. This is at the new bridge over the White Oak River. Scott Grafton has built a new ramp and dock here.
We were honored today to be visited by Commissioner Richard J. Hunt of Carteret County. He is on the right listening in on what Doug and Elmer are discussing about our video Doug is making. Joanne Somerday is facing the camera. This picture by Cliff Baker of Jacksonville. It was prepared for web site by Ed Gruca.

That is Doug Toltzman of Oak Street Software in the rear in his canoe and Rob West upfront with the camera an on a tripod. They are making a video of our trip today.

This is a view of the new bridge. That is Gary Scruggs in his Wenona canoe with Jim Morr of Morehead City next to our trash barge.

Bill Murray of Morehead City sitting on the dock waiting for for us to get under way.

This is a concrete ramp on Webb Creek owned by the State of NC. We wish it could be opened to the public. There is no public access in Onslow County from Swansboro to Gibson Bridge above Maysville! This is snot right!

This is the railroad bridge over Webb Creek.
Here we are at our lunch stop. L/R, Jim Morris, Dale Weston of Jacksonville, Gary Scruggs formerly of Newport, Cliff Baker of Jacksonville, Joanne Somerday of River Bend, Julie Miner of Arapahoe, Doug Toltzman of Hubert and Bill Murray of Pine Knoll Shores. Elmer Eddy of Trenton took the picture.

Same picture with Elmer between the two girls and Rob West of Jacksonville taking the picture.

A view of the quarry lake at Silverdale. The alligator was not seen today.
Loads of ducks were.
This is our most unusual piece of trash found today. It was thrown off the bridge opposite Boondocks. We are asking NCDOT and/or the Coast Guard to remove it.

This is the very worst trash we found today. We believe it is Alligatorweed!
It is not dead. This was found floating just around the bend on the south side of the White Oak River as we headed for Webb Creek.

Dale Weston has taken it to Dr. Diana Rashash for definite identification. This is all of it at this spot. None was left floating on the surface. If it is positive, and we feel sure it will be, we all, everbody, should make an organized scouting trip immediately to find its source.

It did not grow here where we found it. It grew upstream somewhere and high water flushed it out.There is more of it somewere up there. We must find it now before another growing season.

We certainly do not want the White Oak River to become another Southwest Creek.

It is now the 23rd of January. Diana has identified this weed as Smart Weed. It is a natural local weed which looks very much like Alligatorweed in stems and leaves but its flower is entirely different. We have asked Diana what to do about it if we find anymore in the future.

This is our trash haul for the day. The couch/sleeper is still in the river.
Four Stewards had to leave early after lunch. There was one tire three ghost crab pots and the usual floating bottles and cans and plastics. Who knows how many bottles and cans sank to be there forever.

Please do not litter folks!

It was as great day on the water. We had loads of fun paddling together and left with a good sense of satisfaction in what we accomplished for the good of our beautiful White Oak River Watershed.

Please come and join us sometime.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman

Waterway Stewards

http://waterwaystewards.blogspot.com/
207 Spann Road, Trenton, NC, 28585
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/

for older write-ups of our trip and

Waterway Stewards for recent ones.

“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

More litterbugs were swatted in 2009 than in 2008.

More than 11,700 littering reports were received and processed through the

N.C. Department of Transportation Swat-A-Litterbug program from

Jan. 1 through Dec. 30, 2009 — a 20-percent increase from the 9,600 processed in 2008,

according to an NCDOT news release.

Information required to make a report includes:

the vehicle’s license plate number;

date and time of the incident; street name;

city; county;

and a description of the littering offense observed.

For more information about the department’s anti-litter efforts or to make a Swat-A-Litterbug report online, visit

http://www.ncdot.gov/~beautification.

Call in a report at 1-877-DOT-4YOU. Mail-in Swat-A-Litterbug cards can be obtained by calling 1-800-331-5864.

2009-01-19 White Oak River and Webb Creek, Stella, NC

2009-01-10 White Oak River and Webb Creek, Stella, NC

Here we are at Boondocks at Stella, NC. This is at the new bridge over the White Oak River.
Scott Grafton has built a new ramp and dock here.

That is Doug Toltzman of Oak Street Software in the rear in his canoe and Rob West upfront
with the camera an on a tripod. They are making a video of our trip today.

This is a view of the new bridge. That is Gary Scruggs in his Wenona canoe with Jim Morris
of Morehead City next to our trash barge.

Bill Murray of Morehead City sitting on the dock waiting for for us to get under way.

This is a concrete ramp on Webb Creek owned by the State of NC. We wish it could be opened
to the public. There is no public access in Onslow County from Swansboro to Gibson Bridge
above Maysville!

This is the railroad bridge over Webb Creek.
Here we are at our lunch stop. L/R, Jim Morris, Dale Weston of Jacksonville, Gary Scruggs formerly of
Newport, Clif of Jacksonville, Joanne Somerday of River Bend, Julie Miner of Arapahoe, Doug Toltzman of Hubert and Bill
Murray of Pine Knoll Shores. Elmer Eddy of Trenton took the picture.

Same picture with Elmer between the two girls and Rob West of Jacksonville taking the picture.

A view of the quarry lake at Silverdale. The alligator was not seen today.
Loads of ducks were.
This is our most unusual piece of trash found today. It was thrown off the bridge opposite Boondocks.
We are asking NCDOT and/or the Coast Guard to remove it.

This is the very worst trash we found today. We believe it is Alligatorweed!
It is not dead. This was found floating just around the bend on the south side of the White Oak
River as we headed for Webb Creek.

Dale Weston has taken it to Dr. Diana Rashash for definite identification. This is all of it at this spot.
None was left floating on the surface. If it is posistive, and we feel sure it will be, we all, everbody,
should make an organized scouting trip immediately to find its source.

It did not grow here where we found it. It grew upstream somewhere and high water flushed it out.

There is more of it somewere up there. We must find it now before another growing season.

We certainly do not want the White Oak River to become another Southwest Creek.

This is our trash haul for the day. The couch/sleeper is still in the river.
Four Stewards had to leave early afer lunch. There was one tire three ghost crab pots and the usual
floating botles and cans and plastics. Who knows how many bottles and cans sank to be there forever.

Please do not litter folks.

We were honored today to be visited by Commissioner Richard J. Hunt of Carteret County.
I am sorry I did not get his picture. Doug has him on the video. Commissioner Hunt
stayed with us until we took off.

It was as great day on the water. We had loads of fun paddling together and left with a good
sense of satisfaction in what we accomplished for the good of our beautiful White Oak River Watershed.

Please come and join us sometime.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman

Waterway Stewards

http://waterwaystewards.blogspot.com/
207 Spann Road, Trenton, NC, 28585
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoak
stewards.org

Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/

for older write-ups of our trip and

Waterway Stewards for recent ones.

“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

More litterbugs were swatted in 2009 than in 2008.

More than 11,700 littering reports were received and processed through the

N.C. Department of Transportation Swat-A-Litterbug program from

Jan. 1 through Dec. 30, 2009 — a 20-percent increase from the 9,600 processed in 2008,

according to an NCDOT news release.

Information required to make a report includes:

the vehicle’s license plate number;

date and time of the incident; street name;

city; county;

and a description of the littering offense observed.

For more information about the department’s anti-litter efforts or to make a Swat-A-Litterbug report online, visit

http://www.ncdot.gov/~beautification.

Call in a report at 1-877-DOT-4YOU. Mail-in Swat-A-Litterbug cards can be obtained by calling 1-800-331-5864.

2009-01-14 Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune

2010-01-14 Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune NC
We were very pleased with what we found out about Alligatorweed in this creek.
We had hoped the heavy rains we have been blessed with recently had picked up
and moved tons of it downstream. We are happy to report that is exactly what has
happened.

The picture below is of one batch that was left behind because it was hung up on
woody debris in the river. We released it and as you can see, it is on its way again
down to salt water.

All floating alligatorweed is brown as it lays on the surface of the water. However
these stems and roots are 5 to 8 feet long and are very green below the surface.
A few days of warm weather and new bright green shoots appear and quickly
develop leaves.

This is the largest trout any of us have ever seen. According to the depth finder
there are many this size in the deep holes. Fishermen could join us and
release patches of alligatorweed to float downsteram to its death in salt
water and do a little fishing too. If successful you could drop one off in our boat!

This trout was floating on the surface. Notice his tail has been eaten off.

This is looking under the railroad bridge where this batch of alligaotorweed is
hung up on the old pilings which were left in the water and cut off at water level.
Another section with woody debris and alligatorweed hung up on the pilings.

If these pilings were not there all could have gone on downstream. It was an
illegal act to have left them there. This should be corrected now by removing
them down to ground level

Ditto in another opening. The high waters raised the alligatorweed above the
pilings and washed some of it downstream. We hope to get what is left out
and gone on our next trip.

The extemely large masses of alligatorweed that were here last summer are gone.

This will make the fourth time we have cleared this bridge area. These old pilings
are strainers collecting alligatorweeds and everything else that comes downstream!

Camp Lejeune Marune Patrol on a lunch break.
The end of the road. Stopped by a blown down tree. This needs to be removed
along with others that snag the floatng alligatorweed. We got to about a mile
or two from the route 17 bridge.

That is a clam rake. An excellent tool to get the weed free floating again with the
river current. the garden or lawn rake on the deck is also a good tool for this.
Another batch on its way downstream.
More batches of alligatorweed free floating down to its death.
Another shot of the same.
This picture was taken back in the summer. It is included here to show the contrast
in the mass or volume of the weed in each season. It doubles in total mass
every two to three weeks in the warm weather. Winter is best time the time to move it.

In this year, 2010, we hope to have it all out and gone by March 15th in the main
channels where we have good current flow. Please come with motor boats and
canoes and kayaks and help us get this done. Canoers and kayakers can easilly
move the batches off whatever that it may have caught on again.They can do
this easily with their paddles so it will make it all the way to salt water.

Motor boaters can launch their boats at marinas on base or anywhere and motor
upstream to join us. Those with canoes and kayaks and trailers with motor boats

can meet us at 9:30 this Thursday, the 21st, at the Food Lion parking lot
opposite the main gate to the air base on Rte 17 south of Jacksonville.

Help us get them floating free like this. If they are not there anymore they
cannot grow there can they?
We cannot promise you a fish like this. They are here. It’ s up to you to catch them!
Thanks, Elmer.

Our particpants on this trip were Jim Niedermeyer up front in 16 foot motor boat,
Leo Schmidt operator of the boat and Elmer Eddy in the rear. We accomplished more
in this one trip than we would have in three trips with our canoe.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman

Waterway Stewards

http://waterwaystewards.blogspot.com/
207 Spann Road, Trenton, NC, 28585
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

More litterbugs were swatted in 2009 than in 2008.

More than 11,700 littering reports were received and processed through the

N.C. Department of Transportation Swat-A-Litterbug program from

Jan. 1 through Dec. 30, 2009 — a 20-percent increase from the 9,600 processed in 2008,

according to an NCDOT news release.

Information required to make a report includes:

the vehicle’s license plate number;

date and time of the incident; street name;

city; county;

and a description of the littering offense observed.

For more information about the department’s anti-litter efforts or to make a Swat-A-Litterbug report online, visit

http://www.ncdot.gov/~beautification.

Call in a report at 1-877-DOT-4YOU. Mail-in Swat-A-Litterbug cards can be obtained by calling 1-800-331-5864.

2009-01-14 Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune NC

2009-01-10 White Oak River and Webb Creek, Stella, NC
Here we are at Boondocks at Stella, NC. This is at the new bridge over the White Oak River. Scott Grafton has built a new ramp and dock here.
We were honored today to be visited by Commissioner Richard J. Hunt of Carteret County.He is on the right listening in on what Doug and Elmer are discussing about our video Doug is making. Joanne Somerday is facing the camera. This picture by Cliff Baker of Jacksonville.
Here is Elmer explaining to Commissioner Hunt about how the upper reaches of our rivers are neglected and over looked. Some of the most interesting and enjoyable paddling miles are up in these waters. Either we lack access to get to them or they are blocked by fallen trees. I used the Newport River as an example.

We can’t paddle above Nine Mile Road on the Southwest Prong and on the Norhwest Prong and Cypress Drain the same situation exists. Both extend up into Croatan Forest and look like good paddling to us and possibly an access too on the Southwest Prong.

Deep Creek and Little Deep Creek at Newport also look like excellent paddling water if obstructions were removed. This photo by Joanne Somerday.

That is Doug Toltzman of Oak Street Software in the rear in his canoe and Rob West upfront with the camera an on a tripod. They are making a video of our trip today.

This is a view of the new bridge. That is Gary Scruggs in his Wenona canoe with Jim Morris of Morehead City next to our trash barge.

Bill Murray of Morehead City sitting on the dock waiting for for us to get under way.

This is a concrete ramp on Webb Creek owned by the State of NC. We wish it could be opened to the public. There is no public access in Onslow County from Swansboro to Gibson Bridge above Maysville! This is wrong!

This is the railroad bridge over Webb Creek.

The bridge again. By Joanne Somerday. That’s Doug and Rob up there making their video.

Another photo by Joane Somerday.
Rob West. Photo by Joanne.
Doug Toltzman at the controls in his motorized canoe. Photo by Joanne.
Here we are at our lunch stop. L/R, Jim Morris, Dale Weston of Jacksonville, Gary Scruggs formerly of Newport, Cliff Baker of Jacksonville, Joanne Somerday of River Bend, Julie Miner of Arapahoe, Doug Toltzman of Hubert and Bill Murray of Pine Knoll Shores. Elmer Eddy of Trenton took the picture.

Same picture with Elmer between the two girls and Rob West of Jacksonville taking the picture.

A view of the quarry lake at Silverdale. The alligator was not seen today.
Loads of ducks were. It is beautiful lake as you can see.
This is our most unusual piece of trash found today. It was thrown off the bridge opposite Boondocks. We are asking NCDOT and/or the Coast Guard to remove it.

This is the very worst trash we found today. We believe it is Alligatorweed!
It is not dead. This was found floating just around the bend on the south side of the White Oak River as we headed for Webb Creek.

Dale Weston has taken it to Dr. Diana Rashash for definite identification. This is all of it at this spot. None was left floating on the surface. If it is positive, and we feel sure it will be, we all, everbody, should make an organized scouting trip immediately to find its source.

It did not grow here where we found it. It grew upstream somewhere and high water flushed it out.There is more of it some wnere up there. We must find it now before another growing season.

We certainly do not want the White Oak River to become a
nother Southwest Creek.

It is now the 23rd of January. Diana has identified this weed as Smart Weed. It is a natural local weed which looks very much like Alligatorweed in stems and leaves but its flower is entirely different. We have asked Diana what to do about it if we find anymore in the future.

This is our trash haul for the day. The couch/sleeper is still in the river.
Four Stewards had to leave early afer lunch. There was one tire three ghost crab pots and the usual floating bottles and cans and plastics. Who knows how many bottles and cans sank to be there forever.

Please do not litter folks.

It was as great day on the water. We had loads of fun paddling together and left with a good sense of satisfaction in what we accomplished for the good of our beautiful White Oak Rive Watershed and the pleasure of those who follow where we paddled.

Please come and join us sometime. Everyone is invited.

Jim Morris volunteered to take the trash to the dump. He went through it all and recyled the recyclables and took the crab pots to East Carolina Community College where they use them to keep rabbits off their plants. You deserve a gold star for this, Jim!

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman

Waterway Stewards

http://waterwaystewards.blogspot.com/
207 Spann Road, Trenton, NC, 28585
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/

for older write-ups of our trip and

Waterway Stewards for recent ones.

“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

More litterbugs were swatted in 2009 than in 2008.

More than 11,700 littering reports were received and processed through the

N.C. Department of Transportation Swat-A-Litterbug program from

Jan. 1 through Dec. 30, 2009 — a 20-percent increase from the 9,600 processed in 2008,

according to an NCDOT news release.

Information required to make a report includes:

the vehicle’s license plate number;

date and time of the incident; street name;

city; county;

and a description of the littering offense observed.

For more information about the department’s anti-litter efforts or to make a Swat-A-Litterbug report online, visit

http://www.ncdot.gov/~beautification.

Call in a report at 1-877-DOT-4YOU. Mail-in Swat-A-Litterbug cards can be obtained by calling 1-800-331-5864.

2010-01-14 this Thursday Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune,NC

Weather prediction for Thursday for Jacksonville is mostly sunny and 57degrees. We can’t pass that up!.

We will meet st 9:30 in the Food Lion parking lot one block off of Route 17 south of Jacksonville. This is across the highway from the Main Entrance to the Marine Corp Air Base. We expect to be off the water by three.

We have made six trash pick up trips on the Trent River recently. We did this to take advantage of the high water from the heavy rains. It worked well as the high water enabled us to navigate through, over or around the numerous blown down trees.

On the last trip we ended up at Pollocksville. From here on down the river is so wide blown down trees do not block it. We can paddled on down to New Bern anytime we want to.

So, we are returning to Southwest Creek this Thursday to, hopefully, get all alligatorweed in the main channels moving on downstream to salt water where it cannot live. We feel sure we will find these same heavy rains have moved tons of it down for us. We plan to help nature get it all moving down to salt water this year. We almost made it last year.

The freezing weather has killed all above water for us. Now is the time to to get the rest of it free and floating down to its death too.

This weed is a horrible, invasive, foreign weed. It is capable of doubling its total mass every two to three weeks in the warm weather. It does this by growing 360 degrees in all directions both above water and in the water. It is the very worst kind of trash we encounter.

Under water its long stems and roots can be five to eight feet long twisted and entangled together into a mass. Fortunately it is a floating aquatic weed. We simply dislodge it from what ever is holding it back and the current transports it for us down to salt water.

We need more canoes and kayaks and motor boats with us to accomplish this before March 15th. Please come and help us get this done. Marines
please come and help us repel this insidious, foreign invader right here in your back yard.! Fishermen come too, Launch your boats anywhere and motor up Southwest Creek to join us. You will see the brown floating mats of stems. Open up these waters to fishing again. Be able to fly fish for those big bream again this summer.

Lawn rakes, garden cultivators, clam rakes and even your paddles can set it free to float. It is a real pleasure to see it happen.

If it is not there that explosive growth cannot take place. Let’s beat it this year. Thanks Elmer

________________________