2009-04-15 Trent River, Pleasant Hill Rd to Comfort, in Jones County

2009-04-15 Pleasant Hill Road to Comfort, NC Jones County

This is our put-in on Pleasant Hill Road. We took out at Comfort, NC Jones County

A steep drop downs to the water.

Very good water. Nice flow. That is Julia Miner from Araphoe.

This is light pink wild azalea
This is a dogwood on a high bank.
Joanne Somerday gave me a birthday party as she always has for years.
I can’t believe I am 90! My doctor says it is canoing. He says I should go
twice a week.
This lucky person has this lovely place on along narrow lake on this creek.

Jim Niedermeyer getting trash out of a strainer

We came to this new recent blown down tree blocking the whole river.
Doug Toltzman of Hubert use his machete to remove the small branches.

Jim on the main trunk. Doug in the water. Not intentionally
Jim and Doug helping Jim Morris and Connie over
They are stuck there.
Connie got out
Jim made it over.

He left Connie!

Jim, always the gentleman, went back and got her.
We hope Jones County or some good Samaritan will clear this fallen tree out.
Now Doug and Jim are stranded.
Jim pulled Doug’s canoe through and I paddled back and got Jim.
An there comes Joanne!
Beautiful wild flowers.
Some more.
And some more.
Three large cypress trees here are chosen by great blue herons for their
nursery.
Hope you enjoyed your strip with us down the wonderful Trent River. You
can now paddle from here all the way to new Bern! Thank you Jones County!

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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2004-04-04, Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC

2009-04-04 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC
2009-04-04 Southwest Creek

We are working hard to get all existing alligatorweed visible on Southwest
Creek downstream to salt water where it will be killed as it cannot live in
in salt water.

This report is made from a paddle today made from The Old Wooden Bridge,
being the first bridge just below Rte 17, to the Old Atlantic Coastal Railway
bridge where alligatorweed is always stacked up by the old bridge pilings
left in the water between the new bridge pilings.

If we are ever to have an alligatorweed free creek these pilings must be
removed or cut off three feet or more below the surface.

Imagine yourself up front in our canoe today. This is what you would have
seen. This is kind of an inventory of what remains for us to do.

On the left downstream we came upon this first large mat of weed hung up
on a branch or really main trunk of a tree bent over and down into the water.

A short way later another mess.

Not much hung up here but obviously this needs to be removed.

A beautiful wild azalea! What a pleasant surprise.

A close up of the same.
Too bad to spoil it with this hang up.
This is up a side stream.
A small mat hung up by small stuff.
A larger mat also hung up by small stuff.
Ditto.
Ditto again.
This was a dead end up another side stream.
This would be long gone without those branches.
Acer palmatum rubrum! Red maple.
Alligator weed plus other weeds and grasses.
It is all floating. We already dislodged it upstream. It just needs to be set
free again.
This is hung up in a cove by an eddy.
This is a bay or cove off the main channel. We need motor boats to throw
grapples on a rope into it and pull it out into the current of the main channel.

Hung up on stubs.

This downed old tree needs to be removed! We have to pull the alligatorweed
out around it on every paddle!
Here we are at the end of today’s paddle That is the Old Atlantic Coastal
Railway bridge.
What a delightful surprise! The right channel is clear! The high water
together with the current has flushed it all through the bridge!
We were not so lucky on the east side channel.

All of this is hung up here because of those old pilings that were cut off at
water level

What a difference!
Wonderful! The whole river should look like this.

This green is new alligator weed sprouting up through the crushed rocks.
These need to be sprayed now with chemicals. We obviously cannot dig or
pull them up. These are at our take-out at the southeast shoulder of the bridge.

An experiment gone bad due to a hole in the bag!
Hope you enjoyed the trip as much as we did. It was a great day on a
beautiful creek.

The wildlife always adds to the fun. The usual buzzards are over head now
and then. The ospreys have already returned. Turtles were numerous and
quickly splashed into the water at the very first sign of us. Wood ducks
take off quickly too. Squirrels were everywhere until we got to the marshes.
One very large alligator made a frightening splash and muddied up the
water. All that was visible of the other one were two eyes. Little song birds
were everywhere.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”