2009-04-04, this Saturday, Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC

2009-03-30 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC
Here is our report on the above trip which was very successful as you will see.

We go back this Saturday to continue downstream from The Old Wooden Bridge.
We will meet at 9:00 AM at the Food Lion Parking Lot on Rte 17 south of Jacksonville
which is opposite from the Main Gate to MCAS.

In addition to floating all alligator weed off to be carried by the current to salt water
where it cannot live we picked up four bags of trash and litter in conjunction with
The Great Amercan Clean Up which is in process now. This has been reported to
Lisa Grant of Keep Onslow Beautiful.

This Saturday we will do the same. We invite everyone to join us. You can move
floating alligator weed out into the current or pick up trash or just join us for the
paddle.

It will be a warm sunny summer day. Come join us for a very enjoyable paddle
on this on this lovely creek. We plan to be off the water by three.

2009-03-30 Southwest Creek
Looking at the upstream side of the The Old Wooden 
Bridge being the first bridge south of Rte 17. In this 
picture please notice that the alligator weed is hung up by the bridge 
pilings even though they are spaced about eight feet apart. These large 
large masses, which we dislodged to float down stream,.are about two 
feet thick in depth and are pretty well interwoven heavy mats consisting 
of underwater stems on which several  new white side shoots have begun 
new growth at each nodule thus rapidly increasing the both the size and 
the compactness of each mat. Also, above water stems with leaves have 
begun their rapid growth! The yellow stuff you see in front is pine pollen.
 
 The same bridge with out the alligator weed after we had 
assisted it to get through between the pilings to get down to salt water 
where it cannot survive.
 
 
The is the area at Rte 17 bridge, a four lane highway with
dual bridges. This entire area contained the largest mass of alligator 
weed on the entire creek. This huge mass has been here for years and 
growing larger each year in spite of  spraying and  flea  beetles. It is 
99% gone now. We realize some that was rooted and that we did not get 
pulled up will appear above the surface again with time. When it appears 
we will pull it up and put it in black plastic bags and let it decompose 
in the hot sun.
 
 Southwest Creek cleared of alligatorweed.
 
 First violet of the season at our lunch stop.
 
 
The worst strainer below the Old Wooden Bridge. We cut the 
vines and the branches that were holding up the free flow of the 
alligator weed. As you can see it is all gone from here now.to join the 
rest to its demise in salt water..Elmer
Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”
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2009-03-17, this Tuesday, Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC

We are going again on St Patrick’s Day, This Tuesday if you want to join us. Elmer

2009-03-11 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

We are trying to eradicate the invasive foriegn Alligatorweed.

We had a great day on the water today. It was a beautiful warm early spring day and most
enjoyable just to be out there. We were able to dislodge tons of alligator weed and get it floating
down stream toward salt water where it cannot survive.

That is Jim Niedermeyer of Hubert up front and Elmer Eddy of Swansboro in the rear. Ed Gruca
of Emerald Isle took all these pictures. Thank you, Ed.

Here we are under the former Atlantic Coast Railroad Bridge where we launched our boats. This
opening is the only one opening under the bridge for us to get though to go up stream. They all are
blocked as usual with solid mats of floating alligatorweed which has come downstream and held
up here. Even this one has alligator weed from the shore to the bridge as soon as you get through.

See the tops of those four old pilings on the right. They are what restricts the free flow of the river.
In all the other openings they are in the center of the opening which makes it worse.

We hope to get these old pilings removed or cut off two to three feet below the surface so the floating
alligator weed can move freely through with the current. These man made obstructions should not be here.

This picture is below the bridge. Clean as a whistle as it should always be.
In fact the entire river should be this way! We hope to make it that way.

This ruler measures the diameter of the post. It is 11 inches.

There are four of them in each opening.

Here you can look through the pilings and see the alligatorweed hung up by the bridge.
Those three small posts on the left should be removed too.

These fishermen came by where we ate lunch at Old Range Road.

They had a nice companion.

Godzilla the Great Alligator was not visible today.That is his sunning area on the left.
Please notice how pretty and clean the area is with out alligatorweed.

Another gator spot upstream
Alligatorweed collected behind fallen tree. A lot of this has been here for years and has
become well rooted which makes it more difficult to get loose and floating. We
cut this tree down and removed many of the branches which were holding the large
mass of weed here. We believe this is the last of the very bad accumulaltion of
alligatorweeds in any one spot in the main channel.

Alligatorweed loosened and set downstream from above jam.

More of the same. Some of it gets hung up again. It is very easy to move out into
the current again. A good long steady rain raises the water level and flushes it downstream
fast in the stronger current.

Aquatic grasses are beginning to grow and flourish in the warmer temps. Notice the long
white shoots already growing at the nodules of the green stems of alligatorweed.

Trash at our lunch spot. This is a huge metal drum.
This is what appears to be some type of tank vehicle. Too much for us to handle.
Old Range Road is right behind this and is accessable by truck. We hope Camp Lejeune
will remove it. It is on the other side of the river from the Air Base.

Looking ahead,when hopefully we will encounter only small pieces of alligatorweed,
we gathered some long rooted stems with new growth appearing at every nodule and
put them in a black bag. We hung it on the bridge at our put-in where we launch our
boats. It is in full sun and these weeds should deteriate quickly. This is a test.

We hope by now we have convinced all those who question this all natural method of
controlling alligatorweed and that it is far superior to using chemical or imported flea beetles.

We take advantage of our winter’s kill of all growth above water level. This is the best
time to attack it. Nature does all of this for us.

We use the 24 hour a day flow of the river current to transport the floating stems and roots
down to salt water. Nature transports it for us.

As it cannot live in salt water it all disappears before it gets to Maple Landing.
Natures disposes of it for us

Isn’t this not only more effective is killing it but also far superior environmentally in
accomplishing the end result we all desire?

If you still do not believe it please come with us and see for yourselves. If you can,t do this
please check it out on your own and let us know what you think.

Elmer Eddy

Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584

910-389-4588 e-mail: elmer@whiteoakstewards.org

Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”
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2009-03-05 Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune NC

2009-03-05 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC
Looking downstream from the bridge. Its all clear now! It was loaded all the way down to
salt water on both sides of the river with large masses.

Mass of alligator weed piled against the bridge on the upstream side. It is held up here
by the old pilings which were left in the water between the new bridge pilings where they
obstruct the passage of floating alligatorweed. These old pilings must be removed or cut
off two to three feet below the water level if we are ever to eradicate alligator weed in this
creek. The natural current of the river will transport it down to salt water for us.
Jim and Elmer freeing a mass. This alligator weed was held up here by wrapping
itself around these protruding branches of an old fallen tree way out in the middle of the
stream. We have done this many times right here. These branches should be cut off below
the surface to prevent future hang ups here.
There it goes downstream only to be hung up at the bridge again!
Another mass upstream. There area a great many masses upstream. We hope to have them all
downstream soon. Yes, they will all be hung up at the bridge too. On our first day back in
December we had the bridge area completely cleared of all alligator weed. Since then we also
got it all down to salt water where it was killed.

So when we get it all downstream to the bridge from Rte 17 on down we know we can then get
it down to salt water to die.

Some ice on Southwest Creek. It will be gone on Saturday!
Elmer with his yearly pass to MCAS! We are very pleased with this pass. This will save us
time which can be better used on the river!

We are making excellent progress in eliminating alligatorweed in the Southwest Creek
watershed.

More people to join would greatly speed up the operation. Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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2009-03-05 Southwest Creek Camp Lejeune NC

2009-03-05 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC
Looking downstream from the bridge. Its all clear now! It was loaded all the way down to
salt water on both sides of the river with large masses.

Mass of alligator weed piled against the bridge on the upstream side. It is held up here
by the old pilings which were left in the water between the new bridge pilings where they
obstruct the passage of floating alligatorweed. These old pilings must be removed or cut
off two to three feet below the water level if we are ever to eradicate alligator weed in this
creek. The natural current of the river will transport it down to salt water for us.
Jim and Elmer freeing a mass. This alligator weed was held up here by wrapping
itself around these protruding branches of an old fallen tree way out in the middle of the
stream. We have done this many times right here. These branches should be cut off below
the surface to prevent future hang ups here.
There it goes downstream only to be hung up at the bridge again!
Another mass upstream. There area a great many masses upstream. We hope to have them all
downstream soon. Yes, they will all be hung up at the bridge too. On our first day back in
December we had the bridge area completely cleared of all alligator weed. Since then we also
got it all down to salt water where it was killed.

So when we get it all downstream to the bridge from Rte 17 on down we know we can then get
it down to salt water to die.

Some ice on Southwest Creek. It will be gone on Saturday!
Elmer with his yearly pass to MCAS! We are very pleased with this pass. This will save us
time which can be better used on the river!

We are making excellent progress in eliminating alligatorweed in the Southwest Creek
watershed.

More people to join would greatly speed up the operation. Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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2009-03-07, Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC

2009-03 07 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC

Some great pictures by ED Gruca on Saturdays trip. These are what you would have seen
had you been with us. Elmer

Iced yuccas on Emerald Isle Wednesday March 4, 2009

Ice on Southwest Creek Thursday March 5, 2009

No ice on Saturday. Forecast 70 degrees held true.
This guy was out catching some nice morning rays and blending in.
He was still too cold to run.
Krissy Hoover going after some alligatorweed.
We stopped at Godzilla’s sunning spot just up from the bridge. No sign of the Great Gator.
Here we are at the “lunch spot”.
L-R Elmer Eddy, Krissy Hoover, Ed Gruca
A mass of weed sent on its way downstream.
Spanish moss upstream.
Spanish moss below the bridge wrapped around a cedar by the wind.
We spotted Mister Beaver on our way back. He swam across and back across the creek three times,
or six times.
Each time he gave us a great tail whack and splash.
He he is at the log jam where he swam back and forth till he found a way through
by going under.
Cute fellow. We seldom see them in the daytime.
There he goes downstream toward Godzilla’s beach. Good luck Mister Beaver!
Krissy reported she saw Godzilla on her way back around 2:30. This is the earliest sighting.
Here is Godzilla’s tail on March 20, 2007.

Here is Godzilla’s head on April 13, 2007. A smaller gator beat him to the water this time.

Osprey are becoming active at the big nest.
This is one of the V-22 Osprey based at New River MCAS where we put in.

Thanks Ed for the fine pictures. Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”
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2000-03-07 this Saturday, Southwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, NC

To all paddlers everywhere with all kinds of boats and even with motors!

This Saturday we will continue our fight against this evil weed.

Please help us to win this battle. This noxious invasive weed could take over your favorite creek
as it has this lovely creek, which is a fast narrow stream in its headwaters and broad salt water
river before it joins the New River.

Our weather is sunny and 70 degrees. See this beautiful creek on this early summer day.

Our battle is already half way won. We simply pull this floating weed hung up along the shore
out into the current. The winter has already killed all green growth above water. The river
current then carries it down stream to salt water where it cannot grow.

You will have the option of eight different paddles. All you need is a light rake. If you don’t
want to mess with that your paddle will work.

We will meet at 9:30 at the Food Lion parking lot on Rte 17 south of Jacksonville, NC.
We expect to be off the water by three PM.

You can see more details on our web site. We need a SURGE of boaters of all persuasions!

Please join us if you can.

Thanks, Elmer

________________________________

For our latest trip write-up go to
http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/blogger.html

________________________________

ELMER EDDY

ELMER@WHITEOAKSTEWARDS.ORG

STEWARDS OF THE WHITE OAK RIVER BASIN

WWW.WHITEOAKSTEWARDS.ORG

910-389-4588

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2009-03-02 Southwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, NC

2009-03-02 Southwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, NC
It was a very cold morning. We just had three days of off and on rain which raised the New River level at Gum Branch over five feet.
We knew Southwest Creek would rise too so we set out to find out what all this rain had done to the alligatorweed masses we had dislodged to float down stream with the current.

Here is our first picture at the Rte 53 Bridge west of Jacksonville. We spent one whole day here to get three very large masses which had grown in the eddys around the concrete bridge supports. This is on the upstream side of the bridge. No alligator weed!

This is the downstream side. Beautiful isn’t it without those ugly large masses of weeds. The river flow was excellent being a very strong current.

We wanted to launch our boats and head downstream. We could not paddle this section last time as blown down trees and low water made it necessary to abort the trip.

This is a shot looking downstream. That looks like a patch of alligatorweed hung up on something on the left.
We drove on down to Haws Run Bridge. There was no alligator weed to be seen there. Sorry the pictures are missing.

Our next stop was at the Old Wooden Bridge below Rte 17 in Camp Lejeune. This is looking downstream and across the river to the strainer which is always here. The high water and strong flow have almost cleaned it out. There was no alligatorweed in it.

This shot is upstream from the bridge. No alligatorweed!
Our first disaster area! We did have all alligatorweed cleared out here and downstream to salt water where it cannot live. Now here it is coming down from upstream only to be hung up at this man made obstruction. The offending obstructions are not the bridge or its supports. They are the old pilings from the old railroad bridge left in the openings between the new bridge pilings! These old pilings were cut off at water level. They should have been pulled up and out or cut off two to three feet below the surface. This would have allowed the alligator weed to float freely through downstream.

We are working with Camp Lejuene personnel to have these old pilings cut off or removed.

A view upstream from this bridge.
A view downstream from this bridg. No alligator weed in sight!
There is an island below in the middle of this bridge. This picture is of the river on the other side of the island. All openings are blocked preventing the alligatorweed from getting downstream to salt water to die.
We stopped at the Route 17 bridge. The largest mass of alligatorweed in Southwest Creek was right here on the SW side in a huge eddy. We worked another whole day right here but were only able to get about half of it freed and floating downstream. We did get it loosened from the shoreline. That was enough to allow the high water and the current to carry the rest of it away.

Here is how it looked today. We are delighted!

Another shot of the same area. That is duck weed and other floating plant material. The
alligatorweed, with its very long under water stems and roots, is gone. This is the very first time we have ever seen this area clear of alligatorweed!
This is a view of Southwest Creek looking upstream from the Maple Landing ramp off of Verona Loop Road. No alligatorweed was seen upstream or downstream from this ramp. The kill zone is above this point due to the high salt content in the water.
We hope all of the above is proof enough to demonstrate to all that our new method of attacking alligator weed to eradicate it using natures own forces is fast and efficient and preferable to using chemicals and foreign bugs wherever it is possible to get the alligator weed down to salt water.

Please come and join us on our regular trips. We will be working between the bridges and access points. We can have Southwest Creek cleared of all alligatorweed this year with your help. Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will b

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