2009 -01-29, Battling Alligatorweed, Camp Lejeune, Southwest Creek,

We put in at the Railroad Bridge over Southwest Creek. We paddled downstream dislodging all Alligatorweed that was hung up on tree branches or fallen trees in the river.
We went all the way to the 2nd concrete barrier.

Were very pleased to find out that the kill zone of salt water had moved further up stream as there was very little alligatorweed found after the first concrete barrier.

We paddled further downstream to a narrow cut through to the Middle Channel and paddled back upstream in it. We encountered three masses of Alligatorweed in this channel so we will get them next trip.

This picture is of the Alligatorweed coming downstream and being hung up on the bridge. We had this area completely cleaned of all Alligatorweed. Being hung up this way it becomes a
nursery for alligator weed to grow and prosper. The old pilings from the old bridge were cut off
at water level. They are in the middle of the waterway between the new pilings. They must be cut off and let the floating mats of Alligatorweed float freely between the new pilings to their death in salt water Please enlarge this photo to full screen and you will see a sorry sight!

Why let it stay there and wait for warm weather to let it grow and take over the whole river again? To do this will be aidng it to grow and prosper!


We were very pleased with what we accomplished today. If we could get more help we could have the entire creek free of alligatorweed wherever we can paddle our canoes and kayaks.

This is looking downstream from the lower concrete barrier. No Alligatorweed!

This is looking upstream from the concrete barrier. Again, no alligatorweed! That is Larry Jones in the canoe.

On the way home, as dusk came on, we noticed vapor trails criss-crossing the skyline with an
unusual hue. Our military in a dog fight? Could not resist taking this shot!

Great shot, Elmer! (Says Ed Gruca)

Here is Larry again on an alligator free river, here anyway.

Our crew today was Jim Niedermeyer of Hubert and Larry Jones and Elmer Eddy of Swansboro.

Coming up this Friday the 6th of February.

Larry Meadows, former County Manager of Jones County, has informed us the section of the Trent River from Comfort to Chinquapin Bridge has been cleared of fallen trees. He has asked us to come back and do our trash and litter pick up like last year.

So we will meet at 9:30 the the Jones County Offices on Friday the 6th of February. These office are on the east side of Route 58 north of Trenton.

Many of you have asked when we were going to return to the Trent. Here is your chance to paddle it. Please meet us at the County Offices.

If anyone wants to ride with me please be at my house by 8:30 loaded and ready to go.

Thanks, Elmer

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2009-01-27, this Tuesday, Southwest Creek, Camp Lejuene, NC

This Tuesday we will continue our BATTLE AGAINST ALLIGATORWEED on Southwest Creek. We will meet at 9:30 in the Food Lion parking lot on Rte 17 south across from the Main Gate to the Air Base. We plan to be off the water by three.

We will duplicate the trip we made last Friday. We hope to be able to declare the main channel
cleared of all ALLIGATORWEED up to the rail road bridge.

We can do it with your help. Thanks, Elmer

Our report and pictures of last Friday’s paddle are below.

2009-01-23 Southwest Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC
Here are our pictures from today. They are mostly before and after
pictures. We put in at the lower concrete barrier and ate lunch at the
second concrete barrier. We made it all the way to the RR bridge. No
pictures were taken on many small masses.Sorry we have no GPS markings.
I guess I will have to buy one.
Two of us took one side of the river and two the other side. It was a
long way before we saw any alligatorweed. Every bit we moved moved
easily as it had been moved previously. We paddled around the bridge
and the found alligatorweed is building up heavily there. We took a picture.
We also paddled a way down and back on the smaller channel going off to
the right just below the bridge.
This is heavily infested with alligator weed which will have to be
removed from whatever is holding it up.The current in this side stream
is slower. The stream is narrower.
The obstructions are numerous and mostly blown down trees extending
almost across the entire channel. The largest and worst offenders were
in trees blown down and laying strait out from the bank into the river.
Obviously these trees should be removed. This in itself would get most
of the alligator weed flowing down to salt water.
We checked the content of the orange mesh bag right across from our
put-in. Alligatorweed in it appeared to still have life. We moved it
downstream left side to the next point and added another bag taken from
upstream. We will check them next trip.
We found only two crab pot floats we had placed on masses of alligator
weed. These were left upon the bank about six inches above current water
levels The masses they were floating on are gone!
We had as great day. We believe firmly we are winning the battle. Too
bad we did not have twenty people!
When Ed gets the pictures back to me ready to go on the web I will
explain each one. Elmer

Ed now has everything back to me. This is the first alligatorweed we saw.
it was a long way up from the put-in. Sorry, the after picture is missing.
Please believe me the areas was left clean and that little mass was floating
away down stream.

This is the first crab pot we found. We had placed it on a mass of alligatorweed
on a previous trip. The alligator weed has gone. The crab pot is about six inches
above the previous water level. We presume the alligatorweed got enough
salt water treatment even way up here to succumb and begone never to
reproduce again. What could be nicer?

Here is another before picture. Again the after picture is missing. I have it
but it is not on this post to the web site. Sorry.
Maybe that is it floating downstream to its death.
Here is another one and this is after we had cleared most of it. The before
picture is missing. I have it.
Here you can see the same obstructions you saw in the previous picture
without the alligatorweed trapped by them. What you see floating is from
another mass hung upstream which we released.

Another released mass on its way to certain death. None of it will ever sprout
and grow again.

Look at this mess hung up by these little branches. We got it all loose but
this coming Tuesday we will have our electric reciprocating saw with us and
will remove all these small branches so nothing will get hung up here again.
Here we are already almost up to the Atlantic Coastal Railway bridge. Look at
that single branch holding up alligatorweed. We will remove that branch
Tuesday. Larry Jones is working on another batch hung up just upstream
Here we are at the upstream side of the railroad bridge. This is where John
Althouse of the Jacksonville Daily News took his video of the alligatorweed
hung up here by the bridge pilings and the old pilings from the old bridge
which were cut off at water level and left in the center between the new
pilings. These old pilings need to be cut off two to three feet below the
surface or they will forever be creating a huge nursery for alligatorweed
to grow and prosper here.

Please notice the two large logs also hung up by the bridge. on a previous trip
we worked all day to remove all alligatorweed from this bridge. What you see
here has come downstream and was unable to get though the bridge. Without
the bridge and the submerged old pilings it probably would have already made
it to its demise in salt water.

This is a “before” picture. At those for upright limbs previously shown.

We are now leaving the main channel and heading down a smaller channel
which takes off to the right just below the bridge. We have not been in here
before. Notice the obstruction and the alligatorweed. The obstruction should
be removed.

Another mass along the marsh grass hung up by that stick and probably an
eddy in the channel.
< img src="http://docs.google.com/File?id=dgfq35sf_4023dq7x5jjb_b" />

Look at this mess. This is a perfect nursery for alligatorweed to grow and prosper.

This is a view downstream on this side channel. We will be clearing this as
soon as we get the main channel completely cleared. We are going to need a
lot more bodies to help us here.

We need you fishermen to come and help us. Just bring a rake and take a
little time off fishing to come and help move the messy masses downstream
to its death. It will take over the entire surface of this waterway if we don’t.

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2009-01-20, FIRST SURGE IN BATTLE WITH ALLIGATOR WEED

Due to the snow storm this trip is rescheduled for Thursday, the 22nd when it is to be sunny and 50 degrees

OUR FIRST SURGE IN BATTLE IS THIS TUESDAY 2009-01-20, please see plans
at end.

At our monthly meeting of the New River Round Table we received approval
to continue
our newly discovered natural method to control and even possibly
eliminate this invasive
aquatic weed from taking over our waterways.

This trial test is to be confined to this one area on Southwest Creek
from the Old Atlantic
Railway bridge downstream.

This new method is to take advantage of the winter kill of alligator
weed which has already
killed all growth above the surface of the water. So nature has already
done 50% of the job
for us.

The normal flow of water downstream has carried additional tons of the
underwater growth
downstream too.

So all we have to do is to free the rest of it remaining in the water so
that the current can carry
it down to its death in salt water.

It is a floating aquatic weed. It grows new stems under water. It also
grows stems and leaves
above water in warm weather. If it reaches a muddy or silted bottom it
will root and form short
hair like roots in small masses. This happens when it is caught in an
eddy out of the main river current.
These roots pull up easily if one does not try to pull up too many at once.

The very long stems of this weed get entwined into large masses. If it
is all floating it will all move
together downstream.

Two things can then happen to these masses. They can get caught in an
eddy and remain there and
continue their very rapid growth habit. And they can get caught on an
over hanging branch coming
down into the water or a fallen tree or even a stob or post.

Our job is simply to free such masses from what ever is holding them up
so they can continue their
journey down to salt water to be killed.

Please particularly note that all we are really doing is simply aiding
nature to finish the job she has
already undertaken naturally and done about 75% of the work for us. Why
wait for it to grow in
warm weather when it will quickly double, and triple and quadruple its
size very quickly?

LET’S JOIN WITH NATURE AND FINISH THE JOB NOW!

The weather is to be SUNNY and 48 degrees!

We will meet at 9:30 at the Food Lion parking lot on Rte 17 south of
Jacksonville. This is across
from the Main Gate to the Air Base.We will then go in the lower gate
and get our passes to get on
the Base.

We will go down the dirt road off the end of the runway to Southwest
Creek and work our way upstream
toward the Railroad Bridge. We will go up as far as time permits. We
have already done a good part of this.

Light garden rakes, three pronged garden cultivators, hand clippers,
lobbers, even your paddles will work to
dislodge the alligator weed Hand saws, and chain saws will help in places.

We will check on the mesh orange bag we tied up in the water across from
the put-in. We filled it with
alligator weed. We think the water is salty enough to kill it here. We
encountered the first sighting of
alligator weed just above this point. We are anxious to see what remains
in that bag.

Every one is invited to bring his fishing rod. The trout are still here.
No reason you can’t have a float and
a shrimp in the water!

Fishermen with motor boats. Launch your boats wherever you usually do
and join us. Help us to keep the
whole river open for fishing. We might even open some new good spots for
you to fish! You fishermen
can do this anytime you are fishing here. E-mail us and tell us and you
will automatically become Stewards.
Or just meet us on the river and say hello.

Thanks to all, and especially thanks to those who made it possible for
us to make this trial effort on this
natural new way to combat alligator weed. Elmer, for Stewards of the
White Oak River Basin.

For our latest trip write-up go to

http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/blogger.html

________________________________

ELMER EDDY

ELMER@WHITEOAKSTEWARDS.ORG

STEWARDS OF THE WHITE OAK RIVER BASIN

WWW.WHITEOAKSTEWARDS.ORG

910-389-4588

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2009-01-09 White Oak River, Stella to Cedar Point Croatan Nat;ional Forest Ramp, NC

2009-01-09 White Oak River
Stella to Cedar Point in Croatan National Forest,
Carteret County Shore, NC
This is the new Mac Daddy’s in Cape Carteret on Golphin Dolphin drive.

This is where our day’s outing began. MacDadd’ys is a fabulous place.
We were amazed and surprised at the size of the place and the many
varied services they offer. We could have spent the whole day right here

with pleasure. !

The old plane on the golf course.

The Carteret County Chamber of Commerce, The
Careret County Association of Realtors and NCCoast
Communicatoins chose MacDaddy’s as their meeting
place for their for their Board Level Planning Session.

They also chose this time to present The Crystal Coast Quality of Life Award to us, The
Stewards of the White Oak River Basin. This is Elmer Eddy accepting the Award from Tom
Kies, Chamber Board Member of NC Coast Communications which sponsors the award with
the Carteret County Board of Realtors.
This is the Award.

L/R Stewards. Ed Gruca of Emerald Isle and Richmond, Jim Niedermeyer of Hubert, Jim Morris
of Morehead City, Elmer Eddy of Swansboro, Dale Weston of Jacksonvile, Scott Brown of
Morehead Ciry and Chris Barnes of Carteret County Chamber of Commerce.

Elmer talking with Jannette Pippin, Staff Writer of the Jacksonville Daily News.

Janette would not go paddling with us!

Mac Daddy’s is a new sports complex with all the latest technology!

Here we are at our put-in at Boon Docks in Stella. Scott Grafton has built a beautiful new Ramp here at
the new bridge for the public to enjoy.
A close up of the sign showing a trip map of the White Oak River. See that oxbow at the top just
below Stella. We kept to the left and cut through a short cut channel on the Carteret side. We also
hugged the shore line of Carteret County. That is where the trash and litter is found at the high tide
line not out in the middle of the river. Also the sights to be seen are along the shores, not out in
the middle.

We went down the other side of Jones Island and turned up Boathouse Creek to the Croatan
National Forest Ramp.

This the Camp Lejeune to CherryPoint Railroad
bridge. If you keep way to the left going down stream
you will get through close to shore. This will lead you
right into the cut off channel which saves about a mile.

Back in the White Oak River after the cut-off channel. That is the new White Oak Shores RV campground at the horizon.
We have permission to use their ramp too.
It was a beautiful clear day. This must have been a woods fire in Hofmann Forest or Camp Lejeune.
We had a N/W wind at our back and it seemed like we were sailing down The White Oak River! The
only other boat we saw was a fisherman tending his nets.
This is our lunch stop at the old site of Worthy Is The Lamb the outdoor theater. We
understand it is going to become a girls school.

Scott Brown broke open a bottle of champagne to celebrate our award! The picnic table was on the
sandy beach in front (or back) of Worthy is the Lamb.

Now we know why Scott had such a large cooler. He brought the champagne!
Everything is being dismantled.
The amphitheater and stage with the moat and boat in front. They had camels and donkeys and sheep.
It was a very successful and popular out door theater at one time.

Another shot of the boat and moat.
I just had to try it out!
That is Jones Island in the background. It is now a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. That is River Reach subdivision
in Onslow County on the right and Pettiford Creek Bay is on the left.
A discarded souvernir of Worthy Is The Lamb. It was a seat for the hard benches.
The moon was full and close to earth. The tides were
extra high and low. Those are canoe and kayak paddle
tracks in the silted in mud of Boathouse Creek. This is
the first time we ever made paddle tracks! In our opinion
this siltation has been caused my man made operations over
the past years. We feel it should be removed down to the
original depth of the creek.

This is looking up Boathouse from the ramp. We have
paddle 1/2 mile up there.

Low tide at Cedar Pt. You can see our boat tracks in the mud.The paddles left marks also.
It looked like a mother loggerhead had crawled in to the ramp.We struggled the last 200
yards and were lucky to get in as the tide had a few more inches to go.

The paddle is over. The boats are loaded.
It was a most eventful and enjoyable day
on the water and we found less thana bag
litter and trash in the wholetrip!

Thanks again to all who made our award possible
both to the those who created and presented the
award and to those Stewards who were not here
today but made the award possible.

And you know what? We saw no alligator weed. We think this is because the water is too
salty for it grow. We believe the kill area is about where Wildlife installs the Inland/Salt water
license signs. Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail: elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

2009-01-09 White Oak River

Stella to Cedar Point in Croatan Forest, Carteret County Shore, NC
This is the new Mac Daddy’s in Cape Carteret on Golphin Dolphin drive.
The old plane on the golf course.
Mac Daddy’s is a new sports complex with all the latest technology!
sf
azfds
Now we know why Scott had such a large cooler. He brought champagne!
2009-01-09 White Oak River
Stella to Cedar Point in Croatan National Forest,
Carteret County Shore, NC
This is the new Mac Daddy’s in Cape Carteret on Golphin Dolphin drive.

This is where our day’s outing began. MacDadd’ys is a fabulous place.
We were amazed and surprised at the size of the place and the many
varied services they offer. We could have spent the whole day right here

with pleasure. !

The old plane on the golf course.

The Carteret County Chamber of Commerce, The
Careret County Association of Realtors and NCCoast
Communicatoins chose MacDaddy’s as their meeting
place for their for their Board Level Planning Session.

They also chose this time to present The Crystal Coast Quality of Life Award to us, The
Stewards of the White Oak River Basin. This is Elmer Eddy accepting the Award from Tom
Kies, Chamber Board Member of NC Coast Communications which sponsors the award with
the Carteret County Board of Realtors.
This is the Award.

L/R Stewards. Ed Gruca of Emerald Isle and Richmond, Jim Niedermeyer of Hubert, Jim Morris
of Morehead City, Elmer Eddy of Swansboro, Dale Weston of Jacksonvile, Scott Brown of
Morehead Ciry and Chris Barnes of Carteret County Chamber of Commerce.

Elmer talking with Jannette Pippin, Staff Writer of the Jacksonville Daily News.

Janette would not go paddling with us!

Mac Daddy’s is a new sports complex with all the latest technology!

Here we are at our put-in at Boon Docks in Stella. Scott Grafton has built a beautiful new Ramp here at
the new bridge for the public to enjoy.
A close up of the sign showing a trip map of the White Oak River. See that oxbow at the top just
below Stella. We kept to the left and cut through a short cut channel on the Carteret side. We also
hugged the shore line of Carteret County. That is where the trash and litter is found at the high tide
line not out in the middle of the river. Also the sights to be seen are along the shores, not out in
the middle.

We went do
wn the other side of Jones Island and turned up Boathouse Creek to the Croatan
National Forest Ramp.

This the Camp Lejeune to CherryPoint Railroad
bridge. If you keep way to the left going down stream
you will get through close to shore. This will lead you
right into the cut off channel which saves about a mile.

Back in the White Oak River after the cut-off channel. That is the new White Oak Shores RV campground at the horizon.
We have permission to use their ramp too.
It was a beautiful clear day. This must have been a woods fire in Hofmann Forest or Camp Lejeune.
We had a N/W wind at our back and it seemed like we were sailing down The White Oak River! The
only other boat we saw was a fisherman tending his nets.
This is our lunch stop at the old site of Worthy Is The Lamb the outdoor theater. We
understand it is going to become a girls school.

Scott Brown broke open a bottle of champagne to celebrate our award! The picnic table was on the
sandy beach in front (or back) of Worthy is the Lamb.

Now we know why Scott had such a large cooler. He brought the champagne!
Everything is being dismantled.
The amphitheater and stage with the moat and boat in front. They had camels and donkeys and sheep.
It was a very successful and popular out door theater at one time.

Another shot of the boat and moat.
I just had to try it out!
That is Jones Island in the background. It is now a part of Hammocks Beach State Park. That is River Reach subdivision
in Onslow County on the right and Pettiford Creek Bay is on the left.
A discarded souvernir of Worthy Is The Lamb. It was a seat for the hard benches.
The moon was full and close to earth. The tides were
extra high and low. Those are canoe and kayak paddle
tracks in the silted in mud of Boathouse Creek. This is
the first time we ever made paddle tracks! In our opinion
this siltation has been caused my man made operations over
the past years. We feel it should be removed down to the
original depth of the creek.

This is looking up Boathouse from the ramp. We have
paddle 1/2 mile up there.

Low tide at Cedar Pt. You can see our boat tracks in the mud.The paddles left marks also.
It looked like a mother loggerhead had crawled in to the ramp.We struggled the last 200
yards and were lucky to get in as the tide had a few more inches to go.

The paddle is over. The boats are loaded.
It was a most eventful and enjoyable day
on the water and we found less thana bag
litter and trash in the wholetrip!

Thanks again to all who made our award possible
both to the those who created and presented the
award and to those Stewards who were not here
today but made the award possible.

And you know what? We saw no alligator weed. We think this is because the water is too
salty for it grow. We believe the kill area is about where Wildlife installs the Inland/Salt water
license signs. Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail: elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, ther
e will be no litter!”

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2009-01-05 Southwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, NC

2009-01-05 Southwest Creek, West of Jacksonville, NC.

Here we are back at Rte 53 bridge over Southwest Creek. We were here on Dec 31, 2008
and spent the entire day at this bridge trying to get the alligator weed growing in three
large eddys floating free to be carried downstream with the current to be killed in salt
water.

We were 95% successful. Today’s paddle was to do the same down river for the next two
miles to the bridge at Haws Run Road.

That stuff floating in the river behind our canoe is alligator weed which
is in the current and being carried downstream.

Our first major obstruction, a log or blown down tree in the water.
The water level in the river has dropped about 8 inches since our last
visit. The alligator weed is left draped over the log. As it is all one
entangled mat it all hangs together. Some smaller loose ends made it
past this obstruction. See that 8 inch diameter log sticking up between
us over the edge of the canoe. That never should have been cut and left
there like that. That log should have been removed from the river completely.

The river should be left cleared from its natural banks to flow freely.
To do otherwise just creates strainers to trap alligator weed and trash
and everything else. Alligator weed so trapped will flourish and grow and
soon block off the entire river.

Here we have it partially cleared off these logs.
Here we are pulling a large floating rake we made out of fencing boards
with large nails being the rake. We can pull large mats out of eddys
and back into the current with this. If the mats have taken root in the
river bottom they must first be pulled up roots and all. White off shoots
appear in water. Dark brown hair like roots form in the river bottom
anchoring the the entire mat. We cannot lift a pitch fork full of rooted
alligator weed. It has to be done a little at a time to get the roots out
and the entire mat floating away downstream. These in water stems
and roots are up to 5 and 8 feet long! We know as we cannot touch
bottom with our eight foot paddles right up next to the bank in some
places.
Our floating boards rake is over to the left. The piece with the nails
connects the two ends of boards you see. We have that entire mat
of alligator weed floating free.
More of the same.
As we went downstream we came upon more and more obstructions.

We had a hard time getting through one after another. All should be
removed bank to bank.

Finally we could not go further downstream due to obstructions completely
blocking our downstream progress. We had to abort the trip and turn
back upstream. This was no easy task against the river current.

Our conclusion is that there is no sense to our going back to this section to
clear the river of trash and alligator weed until such time as the obstructions
are removed. If we cannot paddle it we cannot clear it.

Our recommendation is that the entire river be cleared of all obstructions
immediately now when the above water greenery is all killed by our winter
weather. This alone will do more to help eradicate alligator weed in
Southwest Creek than anything else we can do.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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2008-12-27, Soutwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, N

2008-12-27 Southwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, NC.

This was an exploratory trip to ascertain the extent of Alligator Weed infestation on the 7 mile stretch of Southwest Creek from Haws Run Road Bridge to Camp Lejeune at the Old Wooden
Bridge just south of Rte 17.


This does not belong in the river!

Neither does this!
Trash and alligator weed in a strainer. All should go!

More of the same.

Another strainer with trash and litter and Alligator Weed.
Back to the railroad bridge again with a crab plot floating on a mass
we set free upstream and hung up at the bridge. (This was on a previous trip.)
This sign is at the Old Wooden Bridge. We added our Canoe Trail sign provided by American
Canoe Association and LL Bean. The one bag of trash was from a previous trip by Jim Niedermeyer and Elmer Eddy.
That is Jim Niedermeyer up front in our tandem Old Town Discovery 174 looking over the massive growth of Alligator Weed collected in this large eddy on the upstream side of the Rte 17 bridge. This particular spot has been treated several times by adding flea beetles to eat it. It definitely has not been successful here or this weed growth would not be here.

Jim and I are trying our best to get it back into the flow of the river and out of this eddy where it grows and grows and grows in a perfect natural nursery.

Another view of the same.
It extended along the shore back down to the bridge.
I
We worked at it for several hours by tearing what we could away from the entangled mat and
towing it out of the eddy into the current that it took off in its journey to death in salt water.

We were able to get about 1/2 of it moving downstream. It will take another visit and more people to get it all.

Back to today’s paddle. This is the first batch of alligator weed on the left downstream of Haws Run Road bridge. I looks like an easy bunch to move out into the current. We can’t do this now on this 7 mile trip. We will get it next time.
Here we are at a mowed field on the left downstream after lunch. It is an excellent lunch stop.
We hope the owners will let us use it as an access to get on the river. If anyone knows who owns
it please let us know so we can contact them. We need more access points along this seven mile
stretch to get at the alligator weed and do our work.

L/R Paul Petronsky from Pennsylvania, Jim Morris from Morehead City, Pam Bader from Bethesda, Md. and Emerals Isle, Hugh Passingham from Maplehurst, George Spleth from Wilmington, and Mike Morrison from Jacksonville.

This is Emer, The White Oak River Trashman and Alligator Weed Eater. Photo by Pam Bader.
What is the name of this tree with these beautiful berries?

A very bad blown down tree blocking the whole river. We had to portage.
A view of the same from the downstream side. This has got to go!
Alligator weed isn’t the only thing that is coming out on these warm summer days!
Two Marines who preceded us downstream duck hunting.
A heart warming story by our good Steward, Doug Toltzman

“I managed a short paddle today on Queens Creek, but I had to stop and
call my neighbor for help to rescue this pelican …

The fishing lure had 3 hooks on either end. Three of them were
deeply embedded in the pelican’s throat and one (on the other end)
was caught on the pelican’s wing. The pelican could not fly or eat.
I’m guessing from the blood on it’s beak that it had been suffering
for some time. We managed to catch it and remove the hooks. I’m
pretty sure I saw her flying on my way back. Her mate watched us
from a safe distance the entire time I was with her and while we
worked to remove the hooks. I had to call for help because I didn’t
have a cutting tool and I’m pretty sure I could not have done it
myself. Fortunately, my neighbor was home and I was able to keep the
pelican corralled near a boat landing, where they could meet me. As
it turns out, I’m glad I chose to go out alone on the creek. Usually
when I find birds like this, they are already dead.

Douglas Toltzman”

Great work Doug!

To everlyone who possibly can, please come and be an Alligator Weed Eater and help us eradicate this horrible invasive weed from this lovely creek. Let’s reclaim this creek so all can fish and paddle it year round.

Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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12-31-08 Southwest Creek, west of Jacksonville, NC

2008-12-31 Southwest Creek west of Jacksonville, NC
New paddle this Monday the 5th. See below.

Southwest Creek is accessible at bridge on Route 53 about four miles west of Jacksonville. This is the last upstream access we know of. If someone knows of another access further upstream please tell us how to get there. This is very important as we are trying to eradicate the noxious imported alligator weed from this creek. Below are pictures of it at this bridge. It must be originating upstream and collecting in the eddys below the bridge pilings. You will notice our winter freezing weather has already killed the foot to two foot green foliage above the water.

We have discovered that if we can get this floating alligator weed downstream to salt water it will be killed there as it cannot live in salt water. In this creek we have observed none exists below Maple Landing in Camp Lejeune.

With it half killed by our freezing weather we are taking advantage of it and freeing the under water roots where ever they may be hung up and using the natural current of the river to transport them to their death in salt water.

The current is there flowing 24 hours a day. The weed gets hung up on low branches and high stobs and in eddys along the way. We need to ease it free if these obstructions.

Above and below are “before” pictures. The roots are already sprouting on warm days and grow 2 to 3 inches above the surface in one 24 hour period. Come March and no more freezes it will
quickly block the whole creek to fishing and boating. I also makes a nice safe home for mosquitoes to thrive.

There it is in big ugly entangled mats on both sides of theriver.

People in the area have used the n/w shoulder of the bridge as their private dumping land fill.
Another view of same.
This sign has not stopped them. We need a camera to catch them in the act!

Here are the “after” pictures. We had planned to go down to Haws Run Bridge. Only two of us
showed up today. It took us all the time we had to get the large mats at the bridge free floating and back into the current.

It is a gorgeous creek even in the winter without the ugly alligator weeds destroying it’s beauty.
The whole river should look like the above. Please come and help us get this done and reclaim this lovely stream from this very obnoxious invasive foreign weed. It is a real pleasure when you see a big glob of it which you set free flowing downstream to its death!

We can do it with your help. We will meet again at 9:30 at the Rte 53 bridge this Monday, the 5th. We will set up shuttle at Haws Run Bridge. This is about 2 miles downstream and we plan to be off the water by 3:00.

Bring a light rake or three prong cultivator. Even your paddle will do it. Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

2008-12-31 Southwest Creek
2008-12-31 Southwest Creek
Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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