2008-12-03 this Wednesday, Southwest Creek, NC

We will meet at the Food Lion parking area across from the Marine Air Base main entrance on Route 17 South
of Jacksonville at 9:30. If you need a base pass please obtain it and be ready to caravan to Maple Landing on Southwest
Creek.

We will of course pick up all trash as usual but the main purpose of this trip is to rid this area of Southwest Creek and
all waterways in the area of this most obnoxious Alligator Weed. which obstructs fishing and paddling every summer.

Mother nature has already destroyed 90% of it. We will now help her to finish the job. It is all explained our web site.
See 2008-11-26 Mill Run, Camp Lejeune, NC.

Ask your fishermen friends to join us. They can meet us on the river. Weather 57 degrees and sunny. Elmer

2008-11-26 Mill Run, Camp Lejeune, NC

Mill Run is a small creek off of Southwest Creek below the railroad bridge.

We have never paddled it before because its mouth is hidden in the area
where Southwest Creek divides into several alternate streams through and
around several islands. It runs under North Verona Loop Road and appears
to be canoe able there.

This is Scott Brown of Morehead City ready to paddle shot gun in Elmer’s
canoe.

This sign identifies the ramp. We meant to add our Canoe Trail sign to it.
This sign also asks all to,”Please don’t Litter”. 95% of the two bags of trash
we picked up today were picked up right here at the ramp. Fishermen please
take your trash out. Please do not leave it here.
Fishermen in Mill Run gave us this trout. Florence and I enjoyed him for dinner.
This is a big glob of alligator weed in Southwest Creek. This is the first sign
of alligator weed we encountered. Last summer it was thick from shore to
shore in this delta of waterways here. One could not paddle or fish most of this
area. Attempts to spray it to kill it and also flea beetles have been introduced
to eat it. We don’t know how successful these attempts to control this invasive
weed have been. It has been thick on every paddle we have made on Southwest
Creek. It is still here as you can see. It is simply waiting for warm weather
to grow again and take over the entire river. We aim with the help of Mother
Nature to stop this cycle.

That orange bags hangs on a branch where this large glob of Alligator Weed
was. What a difference! This very invasive weed grows very fast into a tangled
mass of roots in the water. However the cold winter air kills it above the water
where it grows to be a foot or more thick above the water. This is what makes
paddling and fishing impossible.

Scott and I stuck our canoe into the middle of this glob. We used our paddles
to pull and push the entire mass out into the flow of the stream and out going
tide. The last we saw of it it was making fast progress downstream to the salty
water where the salty content is strong enough to kill it.

This is what nature must have done for us for the great masses of this horrible
weed that was here last summer and prevented us from paddling and fishermen
from fishing.

Goodbye Alligator Weed! We have asked permission from State and Camp
Lejeune authorities for us and fishermen who will join us to pull all alligator
weed we find along all shores of this waterway out into the natural flow of
the water so it will be taken down stream and be killed by the salt water.

There is goes off to its demise! This is the only large mass we saw. We are
sure there will be more further up stream. We saw several very small patches
which can be easily set adrift.

A closer view of our kill! We hope to come back over the next three months
of winter weather to rid this area of Southwest Creek of alligator weed. Our
experience today clearly demonstrates that this is a viable and excellent way
to destroy this very obnoxious weed naturally with Mother Nature’s help.

This is new growth Spanish Moss on a dead Red Cedar Tree up Mill run. We
never did get all the way up to North Verona Loop Road. We must have taken
the wrong channel.

Here is a view of Southwest Creek looking north from the ramp.

This view is looking south. It was as great day to be out paddling.

We are now making plans to go back next Wednesday. We will
concentrate on getting all hung up alligator weed floating downstream to
destruction. A lot of fishermen with motor boats would help too. You can
fish too. The trout are still here as you saw.

Lawn rakes of all kinds, fish gaffs, garden hoes etc are all you need to set the
trapped alligator weed loose to float down stream to it death.

Please come and help us rid this area of Southwest Creek of alligator weed.

Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4

588 e-mail: elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

-- 
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2008-12-03 this Wednesday, Southwest Creek, NC

We will meet at the Food Lion parking area across from the Marine Air Base main entrance on Route 17 South
of Jacksonville at 9:30. If you need a base pass please obtain it and be ready to caravan to Maple Landing on Southwest
Creek.

We will of course pick up all trash as usual but the main purpose of this trip is to rid this area of Southwest Creek and
all waterways in the area of this most obnoxious Alligator Weed. which obstructs fishing and paddling every summer.

Mother nature has already destroyed 90% of it. We will now help her to finish the job. It is all explained our web site.
See 2008-11-26 Mill Run, Camp Lejeune, NC.

Ask your fishermen friends to join us. They can meet us on the river. Weather 57 degrees and sunny. Elmer

2008-11-26 Mill Run, Camp Lejeune, NC

Mill Run is a small creek off of Southwest Creek below the railroad bridge.

We have never paddled it before because its mouth is hidden in the area
where Southwest Creek divides into several alternate streams through and
around several islands. It runs under North Verona Loop Road and appears
to be canoe able there.

This is Scott Brown of Morehead City ready to paddle shot gun in Elmer’s
canoe.

This sign identifies the ramp. We meant to add our Canoe Trail sign to it.
This sign also asks all to,”Please don’t Litter”. 95% of the two bags of trash
we picked up today were picked up right here at the ramp. Fishermen please
take your trash out. Please do not leave it here.
Fishermen in Mill Run gave us this trout. Florence and I enjoyed him for dinner.
This is a big glob of alligator weed in Southwest Creek. This is the first sign
of alligator weed we encountered. Last summer it was thick from shore to
shore in this delta of waterways here. One could not paddle or fish most of this
area. Attempts to spray it to kill it and also flea beetles have been introduced
to eat it. We don’t know how successful these attempts to control this invasive
weed have been. It has been thick on every paddle we have made on Southwest
Creek. It is still here as you can see. It is simply waiting for warm weather
to grow again and take over the entire river. We aim with the help of Mother
Nature to stop this cycle.

That orange bags hangs on a branch where this large glob of Alligator Weed
was. What a difference! This very invasive weed grows very fast into a tangled
mass of roots in the water. However the cold winter air kills it above the water
where it grows to be a foot or more thick above the water. This is what makes
paddling and fishing impossible.

Scott and I stuck our canoe into the middle of this glob. We used our paddles
to pull and push the entire mass out into the flow of the stream and out going
tide. The last we saw of it it was making fast progress downstream to the salty
water where the salty content is strong enough to kill it.

This is what nature must have done for us for the great masses of this horrible
weed that was here last summer and prevented us from paddling and fishermen
from fishing.

Goodbye Alligator Weed! We have asked permission from State and Camp
Lejeune authorities for us and fishermen who will join us to pull all alligator
weed we find along all shores of this waterway out into the natural flow of
the water so it will be taken down stream and be killed by the salt water.

There is goes off to its demise! This is the only large mass we saw. We are
sure there will be more further up stream. We saw several very small patches
which can be easily set adrift.

A closer view of our kill! We hope to come back over the next three months
of winter weather to rid this area of Southwest Creek of alligator weed. Our
experience today clearly demonstrates that this is a viable and excellent way
to destroy this very obnoxious weed naturally with Mother Nature’s help.

This is new growth Spanish Moss on a dead Red Cedar Tree up Mill run. We
never did get all the way up to North Verona Loop Road. We must have taken
the wrong channel.

Here is a view of Southwest Creek looking north from the ramp.

This view is looking south. It was as great day to be out paddling.

We are now making plans to go back next Wednesday. We will
concentrate on getting all hung up alligator weed floating downstream to
destruction. A lot of fishermen with motor boats would help too. You can
fish too. The trout are still here as you saw.

Lawn rakes of all kinds, fish gaffs, garden hoes etc are all you need to set the
trapped alligator weed loose to float down stream to it death.

Please come and help us rid this area of Southwest Creek of alligator weed.

Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4

588 e-mail: elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

-- 

2008-12-20 White Oak River Emmetts Lane Bridge to Gibson Bridge

2008-11-20 White Oak River

Emmetts Lane Bridge to Gibson Bridge
Here we are lined up along Emmetts Lane to unload our boats and launch them in
the White Oak River.

These are two deer carcasses thrown off the bridg by hunters. The stench was unbearable!
This was a sad way to start our paddle down the river. Deliberate pollution at its very worst.T

This is Doug Toltzman getting out the trash collected behind this log. All
this trash was very heavy here below the bridge.

This is a fallen tree all across the river. Fortunately we were able to paddle under it.
Joanne Somerday cutting out some tree tops so we could get aroud this
obstruction.
This is our collection of trash for the day. Notice the large TV which was
thrown off the Emmetts Lane Bridge. Most all to this trash came just below
the bridge. The trash tapered off to nothing as we paddled downstream. Of
course a lot of it sank and wil remain there in the river for ever. We must
concentrate our efforts to get the horrible practice of using our bridges as
dumping trash disposal areas.

Micah Tussey will pick up this trash for us and that at Emmetts Lane Bridge too.
Micah is coordinator in the Jacksonville maintenance office for NCDOT Adopt-
a-Highway program. Thanks Micah!

Group photo by Doug Toltzman. L/R Jim Niedermeyer of Hubert, Jim Morris,
rear, of Morehead City, Doug Toltzman of Hubert, front, George Speth of
Wilmingkton, rear, and Joanne Someday of New Bern, front, Elmer Eddy of
Swansboro, Elizabeth Brownrigg of Durham, Scott Brown of Morehad City,
Cliff Baker of New Bern and Sherman Hawkins of Goldsboro.
The following four photos getting over the downed cypress by Mike Banks of Belgrade.
Mike will be supervising the clearing of these obstructing trees by a Grant obtained by Jones County. We hope there
will be enough money left over to clear the river of future fallen trees as they occur. All river clearing grants should
be so written to make this possible.

When the forests along a river have not been cut we have very few fallen trees. When they are cut leaving a few next
to the river these are usually blown down. That is why a riparian area of trees should be left to prevent what you are
looking at.

We are pulling the boats over one at a time
Cliff Baker of New Bern and a Twin River Paddle Club member pushed his boat under.
Photo by Doug Tolzman. Over the beaver dam! Jim looks like he is about to go under. That didn,t happen.
the heavy weight of the TV and other trash and the two of us grounded us on the dam. If we had taken more time
to make a deeper opening we could have shot down in the sluce with a white water thrill to experience. It is fun!

Please click on the following for some excellent pictures of this trip

by Doug Toltzman

http://picasaweb.google.com/oakstreetsoftware/BloggerPictures?authkey=BtwBOa4_saw#

If you open the above link it will be the next best thing to being with us on this paddle. You can see what we saw and experience what we did!

A note from Elizaeth to all of us:


Dear Stewards,

Thanks so much for allowing me to join you on such a fun trip down the White Oak River. I felt very welcomed. I appreciate your sharing your stories and knowledge and I’m impressed with your group and what you’ve accomplished.
I’m also impressed with the busyness of the beavers and their dam-building, perhaps not so favorably.
I’ll k
eep you posted on the publication date of the article.

– Elizabeth




Elmer Eddy

Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

Upper White Oak River: 2008-November-20

Comments are under each photo; comments are by Elmer Eddy except where otherwise noted.

We picked up two bags of litter right here on this s/e shoulder of this bridge. These signs let the public know this is a Canoe Trail. One can paddle upstream to huge old cypress trees or downstream to Gibson Bridge and Route 17. The signs also ask, “Please do not Litter”

As soon as we were on the water we smelled a horrible scent! Hunters had dumped three deer carcasses off the bridge! They were floating on the surface of the water polluting this lovely river.

This was our first low beaver dam. We were able to get over and threw it easily.

This is Jim Niedermeyer and Elmer. The litter and trash was heavy right here below the bridge. It is obvious some people are using this bridge as their personal trash disposal area. More pollution!

Joanne Somerday is from New Bern and Elizabeth Brownrigg is from Durham. Joanne is a member of the Twin Rivers Paddle Club. Elizabeth is a writer and will write a story of this paddle trip.

This is over half way to Gibson Bridge. It is the first opportunity to get off the river for lunch.The high bank in the background takes you up to huge field where we enjoyed our lunch in the warm sunshine. Mike Banks added ribbon on a branch over the water to mark this spot.

This is at another small beaver dam which we opened up by removing sticks the beavers used to make the dam. Elizabeth built that kayak herself.

Yes, the water level is higher thanks to the beaver dam and this enabled us to paddle around the obstructing floating log. These floating large logs like this need to be removed as each successive rise in the water takes them downstream to block the stream again.

Must be a beaver dam ahead. The water is out of its normal banks.  One can paddle off into the swamps sometimes.

This very low beaver dam is just high enough to catch the floating leaves and debris.

This was one of the higher beaver dams.

A little more work opening that sluice and we would have had a thrilling fast drop. Real white water paddling in Eastern North Carolina!

Sherman is from Goldsboro. He can light a fire in the pouring rain. He has every conceivable safety and survivor equipment with him. Notice the power lines. This large beaver dam is just downstream of these power lines which cross the White Oak River Roads on each side.

Scott is from Morehead City. He moved here recently from California so he could explore our sunken ships off our coast.

Jim Morris is from Morehead City. Jim also built this canoe and another tandem for he and his wife Connie.

The single canoes and kayaks got through this sluice easily. It would have been a faster and more thrilling chute if we had taken the time to open it deeper at the top for a larger volume of water.

Joanne is one the the early Stewards. She has cleaned up many a stream removing all trash and litter. The White Oak River is one of her favorites too.

Cliff Baker is from New Bern and is a member of The Twin Rivers Paddle Club.

Had we opened the dam more for a large volume flow we would have shot down through opening and had a white water thrill which is rarity in Eastern North Carolina.

Thanks Cliff for being our sweep so we knew no one was left behind.

We do not recommend that anyone paddle this section of the White Oak River until it is cleared of all these obstacles. You can probably put in here and paddled down to Route 17 with out much trouble.  Please let us know if you do and tell us what you find. Elmer

Micah Tussey of NCDOT, Adopt-a-HIghway program is pickg up al the trash for us. Thanks Micah.

Doug’s Comment: Here we are with the trash. This is the only photo with the photographer in it!  The 3 in back, from left to right (because this is America and that’s how we do things), are Jim N., Jim M., and George. Then from left to right starting with the guy holding out his right arm, we have Doug (the photographer), Joanne, Elmer, Elizabeth, Scott, Cliff, and Sherman. We found that TV floating on the river, and those orange bags are mostly full of trash. We left the river much cleaner than we found it.

2008-11-13 Mill Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC

2008-11-13, Mill Creek, Camp Lejeune, NC
2008-11-13 Mill Creek, Camp Lejeune. Come and explore the lovely
wilderness creek with us.

This is a small creek off of South Verona Loop Road. Access is at ramp at
the end of Mill Creek Road. It is 2 and 1/2 miles upstream to three culverts
which are under South Verona Loop Road.

At 2.2 miles we took a right fork and came to this abrupt end to paddling.

We turned back and took this left branch under the dead tree archway.

We came to these culverts taking the creek under South Verona Loop Road.

Here is a better view of the culverts with Harry Patterson telling us he
can’t see through two of them. We did not portage over the road.
The stream forks right after the road and might be canoeable further.
This is a fascinating mesh of dead red cedars along the shore
And here is an osprey nest. The ospreys have gone south for the winter.

Spanish moss hangs from trees. This is a particularly interesting sight.

The New River is beyond that berm in the background.
A crabber is apparently using this spot to store his crab pots.
Here we are back at the ramp at the end of the day with our haul of trash
for the day. All this did not come from above the ramp there were only
isolated pieces of litter. It all came from downstream of the ramp to the
New River and along the shores the of the New River.

We went west a very short distance to a large tree which had fallen across
the sandy beach. This was almost to 77 latitude line beyond which one
cannot go with out permission from Stone Bay rifle range.

We then went east and were very quickly loaded with all the trash we
could possibly carry. So, we turned around and headed back to the ramp.

We unloaded our trash and carried it up to this tree where we affixed our
new CANOE TRAIL and “Please don’t litter sign” provided by the American
Canoe Association and LL BEAN.

There were fourteen bags of trash, four tires, four abandoned crab pots two
five gallon pails and some other stuff. This shouldn’t be. We need to find
some way to get the American public to stop littering.

We need to go back here and paddle up to Rhodes Point our next possible
access if we can get permission to use it. A sign on Rhodes Point road says
no POVs (privately owned vehicles) beyond this point!

This is a five mile stretch. We go past Catfish Point, Hines Point, Hickory
Point, Gray Point to Rhodes Point. We will need to unload our trash several
times. We need a lot more volunteers to join us and even then some motor
boats will be needed or we will have to pile the trash up on the shore above
high tide to be picked up later.

Our volunteer Stewards of the White Oak River Basin today were Scott Brown
from Morehead City on the left, Jim Niedermeyer of Hubert center and Bill
Murray from Pine Knoll Shores right. Elmer Eddy of Swansboro was behind the
camera. Harry Patterson of Jackksonville had to leave when we got back to
the ramp


We led the clean up of the White Oak River back in 2002. If we are going
to get the New River cleaned up we will need a lot more volunteers to join us.

Some motor boats to carry away our trash will be great too.

If you want to help please e-mail us and we will add you to our address book
so you will get notices of all our excursions. We do not announce a trip until
we know it will be a good weather.

This view is from the ramp area toward the New River. We suspect that is a
man made berm by fishermen sometime in the past so they could set nets
across the narrow opening to catch flounder and other fish.

The opening is shallow. We know, as a fisher man came in at high speed.
Going out he stopped at the ramp while we were uloading and apologized
for not slowing down. He explained that he had to go at planing speed to
get through the inlet.

Here is the same picture zooming in. Pretty isn’t it!

We had a great trip on a great day. We can say Mill Creek is clean. It is a
wilderness area between the boat ramp and the road culverts. It is well worth
a visit.

We hope to be able to say the entire New River is clean soon. We have cleared
all streams above route 24 and the entire eastern shore except one stretch
opposite where we are paddling now which we had to leave as we were loaded!

With the help of more volunteers we can get it done. Please join us.Please send us
an e-mail that you want to. Thanks, Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters,
there will be no litter!”

2008-11-06, Town Point & Town Creek Camp Lejeune, NC

2008-11-06 New River Town Point to Town Creek
Camp Lejeune, NC
We had as most enjoyable paddle today. Not what we had planned because of the
strong winds but the wind did not bother us south of Town Point which protected us
from the wind as the forest did up Town Creek We were able to cut through several
obstructions and feel we almost got to a connecting road between Town Creek Road
and Rhodes Point Road. This was our first exploration off this creek and we were
surprised how far up we could paddle.

We cleaned up the eastern shore of the New River and tributaries in Camp Lejeune
and now we ae working our way along the western shore line and tributaries.

Here we are a this lovely sandy beach at historical Town Point ready to

launch our boats.
This is Scott Brown from Morehead City. The picture is looking west
toward Town Creek.
This is looking east across the choppy New River.
This is Earl House from Sneads Ferry. He was tired of sitting home and came
on this beautiful sunny day to set a net and catch a few fish.
Earl is holding a speckled trout. He says they stay here all winter.
This was our first obstruction on Town Creek. We managed to hump over it.
We backed up and got up speed to get over it.
This was the end of our paddle up Town Creek. These obstructing fallen trees need to be removed. There is lots of good paddling above this point. Probably all the way ups to the dirt road connecting Rhodes Point Road and Town Creek Road.
Palmettos were thick and very attractive.
Jim Niedermeyer from Hubert enjoying his lunch among the palmettos.
Scott Brown lunching in the palmettos. They were thick everywhere.
Spanish moss adorning a dead read cedar tree.
A closer view of the thick spanish moss covering this entire tree and
waving in the breeze.
Erosion along the shore of the New River.
Another view of the same.
More erosion as we paddled along back to Town Point.
Still more erosion.
Onslow Counties first public seat was here at Town Point!
There was no trash up Town Creek as there is no public access! We picked
up onebag of trash along the shoreline of the New River and one ghost crab
pot. Because the trash was so light we were able to take it out with us.
It was an excellent day on the water. We look forward to more like it.
Elmer
Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman

Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”
2008-11-06 New River Town Point to Town Creek
Camp Lejeune, NC
We had as most enjoyable paddle today. Not what we had planned because of the
strong winds but the wind did not bother us south of Town Point which protected us
from the wind as the forest did up Town Creek We were able to cut through several
obstructions and feel we almost got to a connecting road between Town Creek Road
and Rhodes Point Road. This was our first exploration off this creek and we were
surprised how far up we could paddle.

Here we are a this lovely sandy beach at historical Town Creek ready to

launch our boats.
This is Scott Brown from Morehead City. The picture is looking west
toward Town Creek.
This is looking east across the choppy New River.
This is Earl House from Sneads Ferry. He was tired of sitting home and came
on this beautiful sunny day to set a net and catch a few fish.
Earl is holding a speckled trout. He says they stay here all winter.
This was our first obstruction on Town Creek. We managed to hump over it.
We backed up and got up speed to get over it.
This was the end of our paddle up Town Creek.
Palmettos were thick and very attractive.
Jim Niedermeyer from Hubert enjoying his lunch among the palmettos.
Scott Brown lunching in the palmettos. They were thick everywhere.
Spanish moss adorning a dead read cedar tree.
A closer view of the thick spanish moss covering this entire tree and
waving in the breeze.
Erosion along the shore of the New River.
Another view of the same.
More erosion as we paddled along back to Town Point.
Still more erosion.
Onslow Counties first public seat was here at Town Point!
There was no trash up Town Creek as there is no public access! We picked
up onebag of trash along the shoreline of the New River and one ghost crab

pot. Because the trash was so light we were able to take it out with us.
It was an excellent day on the water. We look forward to more like it.
Elmer
Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”