2008-08-09 Courthouse Bay to Traps Bay

2008-08-09 Courthouse Bay to Traps Bay, Camp Lejeune, NC

(Or the day the rains came!!!!)

We started out from the Marina in Courthouse Bay in our canoes and kayaks.
We paddled around Harveys Point and began picking up trash and litter along the shore in front of the waterfront officers homes.

This shoreline is protected from erosion by rip-rap. This makes trash pick up very difficult. Here we are spread out along the shore recovering all man made litter.

The rip-rap ended just past the barracks and the shoreline became natural with sandy beaches and marsh grasses.

We came to Creels Point about lunch time and dined there on the point. Here we are packing up after lunch.

These folks motored up to fish and seemed interested in what we were doing.

(Picture missing).

As we finished lunch it became obvious that we could not paddle around this bay and make it to our take-out at Traps Bay.It was decided to paddle directly to Wilkins Bluff which we did. Scott and Elmer towing the trash barge fell back to the rear.

By the time we rounded Wilkins Bluff it became obvious we would never make it to the take-out in Traps Bay. A very strong head wind had sprung up from the south/southeast. (Northeast winds hadbeen predicted.) We immediately knew we had to turn around and head back to Courthouse Bay.

Very dark ominous clouds appeared. The wind became stronger. Dale had

managed to call all back but one. We decided Scott and I could make it back to Courthouse Bay going with this wind. Our truck was there anyway being the shuttle vehicle. All others continued on as originally planned.

Scott and I practically sailed back towing the trash barge. But low and behold the clouds got darker. Thunder and lightning got closer and closer and before we could get around Harveys Point into Courthouse Bay the wind had completely reversed itself and was blowing hard into our faces and with extremely bad gusts. The rain was coming down in torrents. The thunder was loud and the lightning flashes almost immediately following. We headed to shore and saw the back side of the rest room at the marina..

We pulled the canoes up and crawled across the rip-rap to the facility. That was a very difficult arduous crawl and climb.We waited out the storm inside the building. I took advantage of the facilities and took a hot shower in my clothes!

The storm quit and it became almost calm. We traversed the horrible rip-rap again back to the canoes and climber in and headed up toward the point. All of a sudden we could not make the canoe move forward any more. We turned around to find the trash barge had tipped over on its side and trash was every where.
The heavy down pour during the storm had filled the canoe with so much water it caused it to tip over. We unloaded the trash and tipped it over to get rid of the water. We also bailed the water out of our canoe too.

Having done this we were able to get back around the point to the marina. We were very surprised not to find the rest of our group there. As we were unloading we received a cell phone call from them saying they went to shore during the storm and could not find the take-out point. They asked me to drive back and blow
my horn so they would know where the take-out was.

By the time I got there, they were already there. Sherman had built a fire in all that rain and they were fine. Fishermen had directed them to the take-out. Dale said Sherman was as real survivor! How many people could do that!

All is well as it all ended well, but folks, had we simply stayed together, as we always should, we all could have turned around as soon as we rounded Wilkins Bluff and made it back to Courthouse Bay before the storm!

Let’s make this a lesson learned!

We thank all that came on this eventful day. It is strange how we happened to catch this “isolated thunder storm”.

The participants were: Sherman Hawkins from Goldsboro, Marian Adams from New Bern, Dale Weston from Jacksonville, Jack Cleaves from Cedar Point, Scott Brown from Morehead City, and Elmer Eddy from Swansboro.

The trash was heavy. Scott and I put ours in the dumpster at the marina. The others left theirs at the end of Traps Bay Road at the mouth of Traps Creek.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website:
http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/

“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

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2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay, New River, Camp Lejeune, NC

2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay, New River, Camp Lejeune, NC
2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay

This is the famous World War II Landing Craft that was supposed to become a museum in waterfront
Jacksonville. Here it rests rusting away in Mile Hammock Bay.

This is a warning sign at the ramp. Brown’s Island is a long paddle from here.

This is another sign at the ramp. This ramp must be the largest concrete ramp in the world!
One of our members learned the hard way the sign meant what it says. He walked into the water to
launch his kayak and his feet slid out from under him. Fortunately he did not get hurt.

This turtle was the recent victim of a power boat!

Clam shells by the billions. Elmer went home with 27 live clams.

Casualties from hurricane Floyd.

This one looks like a grotesque sea monster!

A commercial clammer at work.

This is a suspension bridge over Toms Creek It was built by the marines. There are no piers or
supports of any kind. It will support 20 tons. It saved us going all the way back to Rte 172 on our
shuttle. Not recommended without four wheel drive although we did not have to use it.

Yes, one can sleep in a kayak!

Reloaded and ready to depart from Traps Bay.

Brian Wheat rolling one very heavy tire with the rim on to the trash pile. We counted twenty three
bags, several ghost crab pots, a tent, tarpaulins, hats, shoes, sandals, and pieces of foam. This pile
is about half of what we removed on four days of paddling from Courthouse Bay to here. The other
half was put in the dumpster at Courthouse Bay.

This is an unusually large amount of trash. It must be coming from boats traveling up and down the
New River. Today’s trip produced many cardboard boxes which we decided were boxes used to ship fish.
We hope the fish houses in the Sneads Ferry area not discarding them into the New River.

L/R. Elmer Eddy from Swansboro. Bill Murray from Pin Knoll Shores, Brian Wheat from Jacksonville,
Scott Brown from Morehead City and Ed Gruca, our photographer from Emerald Isle.
Map for this paddle. Please copy and paste the following on the internet and it comes up fine.
http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=2206037

It was a most pleasant day on the water. Future plans for our next adventure not known at this time.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay, New River, Camp Lejeune, NC

2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay

This is the famous World War II Landing Craft that was supposed to become a museum in waterfront
Jacksonville. Here it rests rusting away in Mile Hammock Bay.

This is a warning sign at the ramp. Brown’s Island is a long paddle from here.

This is another sign at the ramp. This ramp must be the largest concrete ramp in the world!
One of our members learned the hard way the sign meant what it says. He walked into the water to
launch his kayak and his feet slid out from under him. Fortunately he did not get hurt.

This turtle was the recent victim of a power boat!

Clam shells by the billions. Elmer went home with 27 live clams.

Casualties from hurricane Floyd.

This one looks like a grotesque sea monster!

A commercial clammer at work.

This is a suspension bridge over Toms Creek It was built by the marines. There are no piers or
supports of any kind. It will support 20 tons. It saved us going all the way back to Rte 172 on our
shuttle. Not recommended without four wheel drive although we did not have to use it.

Yes, one can sleep in a kayak!

Reloaded and ready to depart from Traps Bay.

Brian Wheat rolling one very heavy tire with the rim on to the trash pile. We counted twenty three
bags, several ghost crab pots, a tent, tarpaulins, hats, shoes, sandals, and pieces of foam. This pile
is about half of what we removed on four days of paddling from Courthouse Bay to here. The other
half was put in the dumpster at Courthouse Bay.

This is an unusually large amount of trash. It must be coming from boats traveling up and down the
New River. Today’s trip produced many cardboard boxes which we decided were boxes used to ship fish.
We hope the fish houses in the Sneads Ferry area not discarding them into the New River.

L/R. Elmer Eddy from Swansboro. Bill Murray from Pin Knoll Shores, Brian Wheat from Jacksonville,
Scott Brown from Morehead City and Ed Gruca, our photographer from Emerald Isle.
Map for this paddle. Please copy and paste the following on the internet and it comes up fine.
http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=2206037

It was a most pleasant day on the water. Future plans for our next adventure not known at this time.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay, New River, Camp Lejeune, NC

2008-08-25 Mile Hammock to Traps Bay

This is the famous World War II Landing Craft that was supposed to become a museum in waterfront
Jacksonville. Here it rests rusting away in Mile Hammock Bay.

This is a warning sign at the ramp. Brown’s Island is a long paddle from here.
This is another sign at the ramp. This ramp must be the largest concrete ramp in the world!
One of our members learned the hard way the sign meant what it says. He walked into the water to
launch his kayak and his feet slid out from under him. Fortunately he did not get hurt.

Clam shells by the billions. Elmer went home with 27 live clams.

Casualties from hurricane Floyd.

This one looks like a grotesque sea monster!

A commercial clammer at work.

This is a suspension bridge over Toms Creek It was built by the marines. There are no piers or
supports of any kind. It will support 20 tons. It saved us going all the way back to Rte 172 on our
shuttle. Not recommended without four wheel drive although we did not have to use it.

Yes, one can sleep in a kayak!

Reloaded and ready to depart from Traps Bay.

Brian Wheat rolling one very heavy tire with the rim on to the trash pile. We counted twenty three
bags, several ghost crab pots, a tent, tarpaulins, hats, shoes, sandals, and pieces of foam. This pile
is about half of what we removed on four days of paddling from Courthouse Bay to here. The other
half was put in the dumpster at Courthouse Bay.

This is an unusually large amount of trash. It must be coming from boats traveling up and down the
New River. Today’s trip produced many cardboard boxes which we decided were boxes used to ship fish.
We hope the fish houses in the Sneads Ferry area not discarding them into the New River.

L/R. Elmer Eddy from Swansboro. Bill Murray from Pin Knoll Shores, Brian Wheat from Jacksonville,
Scott Brown from Morehead City and Ed Gruca, our photographer from Emerald Isle.
Map for this paddle. Please copy and paste the following on the internet and it comes up fine.
http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=2206037

It was a most pleasant day on the water. Future plans for our next adventure not known at this time.

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”

2008-08-05 Traps Bay on the ICW on Camp Lejeune

2008-08-05 Traps Bay on the ICW on Camp Lejeune
2008-08-05 Traps Bay on the ICW on Camp Lejeune
This is a view looking up Traps Creek from our put-in on Traps Bay.
This is looking across Traps Bay and the New River from the put-in.
This is looking south from the put-in toward the ICW where it makes a v
turn around Raisin Rock and the high sand dunes to get around New River
Inlet. Hatch Point is on the right and Cedar Point on the left.




This is as far as we could paddle up Traps Creek. It is a very pretty creek.
Green Herons were taking off ahead of us.

This is the roots and trunk of a large red cedar blown over by Floyd and
killed. Notice the oyster shells in the roots. They must have grown there.
Under the trunk is a large bar of oyster shells. How did they get there?

Another dead cedar tree with an oyster bar!

And still another larger one with a larger bar. Very unusual. Very peculiar!
Maybe we should be replanting red cedars to create oyster bars!

A white morning glory to pretty up the shore line.



Our lunch stop after we came out of Traps Creek. We chose a shady spot.

After lunch we paddled south along Traps Bay. The wind had come up and
we had to quit. We raked in 14 clams and headed back to the put-in.

This Saturday, the 9th, we will return and see if we can paddle up to
Courthouse Bay as planned. Jim and I rode together and we had no shuttle.
We also had no bags and had to pile up about three bags of trash at the
put-in. We will bag these on Saturday.

As you can see by these pictures these are wide open waters. If strong
winds come up we will go the the nine Quarry Lakes on the White Oak River
and Clean them up instead.

Jim Niedermeyer, River Watcher for Queens Creek and Elmer Eddy, from
Swansboro had a very enjoyable day. It was a warn one and we cooled off
with a dip or two.

Many people have asked us; Why don’t you paddle on Saturdays?. Here is a
Saturday paddle for you. Please do join us. We will meet at 9:00 at the Main
Gate of Camp Lejeune. We will then caravan to Courthouse Bay to set our
shuttle vehicles.

We will know wind conditions by Friday and will confirm Traps Bay or the
Quarry Lakes. Elmer

Elmer Eddy
Elmer, The White Oak River Trashman
Stewards of The White Oak River Basin
101 River Reach Drive West,
Swansboro, NC. 28584
910-389-4588 e-mail:
elmer@whiteoakstewards.org
Please visit our website: http://www.whiteoakstewards.org/
“If no one litters, there will be no litter!”